1967 Vintage Volkswagen Beetle Z-Bar


Jay Salser does it again, folks. Many many ’67 Beetle owners around the world appreciate the fruits of your labor. – ES

At some point, I accumulated some Z-Bar (Equalizer Spring) Components. I decided to sort these and at least learn their Names and Part Numbers. There’s not much future in calling parts—“the thing-a-ma-jig”. You get the picture.

I know that a lot of 1967 Owners won’t be excited by all of this, but there are some who enjoy knowing about the “minutia” of their cars. For those—I decided to post the information which I have accumulated. Thanks to David Brown, I have been able to acquire those VW Part Numbers which I could not find on my own. And, Neva Salser whipped out her Digital and snapped a multitude of photos from which to choose some for this exercise.

Note: The Z-Bar continued into the 1968 Production Year for 1968 Beetles so that the Z-Bar is not a one-year-only part.

In Europe, the Z-Bar took a different configuration. Also, somewhere in there, the replacement for the Z-Bar with which we are familiar was superceded by the one in the photo below.

SOLD — L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle

Listed for our friends over at BaT, this L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle is an example of period correct along with a few modern upgrades. Also, SB12 Headlights! Who’s going to make an offer?

This 1967 Volkswagen Beetle is a restored example powered by a 1600cc dual-port flat-four paired to a 4-speed manual. Purchased in 2015, the seller has carefully finished the restoration by addressing originality details, and has driven it 3k miles since completion. The body was restored and painted in original Zenith Blue previously and shows well with good chrome. The restored interior is in very nice condition with fresh German materials and a working original Sapphire V radio. A complete tune up was just done which also included an oil change, valve adjustment, a Pertronix ignition, and new alternator. It comes with books, receipts from the seller’s ownership, transferable California black plates, and a clean Oregon title.

Status: SOLD
Mileage: 1,300
Location: Oregon
Price: Bidding on BaT
Contact: Bidding on BaT

Ron Waller — Window Scraper Replacement

This fantastic tech tip style article comes to us from Ron Waller, a loyal reader and part of the ’67 Beetle community. Jay and I appreciate everyone that contributes. Without YOU, there would be no 1967beetle.com. Lastly, let’s pause for a moment to thank Ron for his service to our country. Semper Fi.

I have replaced the window felts and scrapers a couple of times now. There are some excellent sources out there on how to do this. However, I found most of them do not provide enough information it get it back together – right. Make note of how you take the door apart. Pictures are a great backup. When you put it all back together some of the reconstruction is counter intuitive. Those notes and pictures will help. My objective is to help you complete the process with as little aggravation as possible.

After the spilling of considerable blood and using language I haven’t used since my time in the Marines. Jay Salser encouraged me to make notes of what I did hopefully help others who decide to go thru the process.

My outline is only meant to help you get it all back together. You may like their ideas better. Do read them, as they definitely help you especially with the removal.

The SambaRob & Dave’s

The scrapers are fragile and sharp. There are also sharp edges on the inner door – be careful. Before you start keep this in mind. From inside out, you’ll have the inner door panel, regulator, vent window upright, then outer door panel.

The scrapers. One of the hardest and most frustrating parts of this process is getting those little clips which hold the scraper in place into the rectangular holes in the door. It is hard to line them up both vertically and horizontally.

Be generous with the use of painters tape. I put it on all “exposed” surfaces to help prevent an accidental scrape.

Before I even try, I mark the position of the holes with a non-permanent felt pen. Trust me, this will save you a lot of frustration. If you “miss” the clips may be ruined and the parts will need to be replaced.

Next, place just a little bit of candle wax on the end of the clips. Don’t overdo it. I have tried other lubricants, but this was by far the best (thanks Jay!).

Install the outer scraper. Hold it in place with painters tape. It is very thin aluminum and tends to “flap” around. That little bit of tape helps keep it out if the way.

Install the felt clips which help secure the outside scraper.

Some aftermarket scrapers have a screw hole at the top front. The one from WW does not. You probably had to remove a small sheet metal screw during the removal. Before you go to the next step, you will need to drill a hole to help secure the outer scraper. It’s not a big deal, but it definitely helps in lining up the scrapers, vent window, etc. (photo 3)

Install the regulator. Make sure it goes under the top part if the inner door. I missed and had it installed incorrectly. It must go under this lip. This is when you need a third hand as you position the scraper! Do not ask your wife! Look down through the window opening, you should not be able to see it. If you do, you missed. I missed, and what is not an easy job become impossible. You can then install the bolts around the crank and the one needed at the top “left” corner. Install them loosely. Just enough to hold the regulator in position.

When I removed my regulator I thoroughly cleaned it with brake fluid cleaner. Fifty years of grime adds up!

I then placed axle grease in the channels to lubricate the “spring.” When you have the regulator off you will see what I mean.

Insert vent window, but leave it loose. I use painters tape to hold it in place. Reinstall the Phillips screw at the top of the vent window. 

You have to work the front of the scraper rubber into the vertical vent window rubber. I use a bicycle tire tool and dish soap. You need to get the aluminum on the outside of the rubber.

Install the glass.

Put some tape over areas that the glass might rub.

Pull the regulator towards you.

’67 Volkswagen Beetle Hubcaps

Hello, ’67 Beetle community. I wanted to share a great tech tip style video from our good friend, Chris Vallone over in NY. As some may know, we (Lane Russell) do offer the correct hubcaps for your ’67 Beetle. Installing them the right way is equally important. Nothing is more frustrating than dented hubcaps.

Of course, we are here to help if needed. Please comment below if we can do anything for you.

Challenges of Vintage Car Ownership

Challenges of Vintage Car Ownership

An older article we wanted to put in the spotlight again, as we’ve been receiving a lot of emails on this topic.

Before I knew “Jonesie” (not his real name), he had purchased a Beetle which, by all logic, should have gone to the crusher. Never had he revived a car, much less a Bug. But, he had disassembled the car, removed the body from the chassis and proceeded to cut and weld and renew the car.

By the time we had met and become better acquainted, he was driving the vehicle but experiencing some major difficulties due to poor advice which he had received and some poor workmanship from a shop which rebuilt his engine and did some front end work.

I took Jonesie under consideration and introduced him to a bonafide VW mechanic and engine builder. Almost immediately the mechanic identified some of the problems. Together, we began solving and drawing the car out of its slump. It was gratifying to see Jonesie driving and enjoying his car. He talked about it, joined a local club, went on cruises and even was joined by his wife in his forays onto the highways.

I wasn’t surprised when he asked for help to build an authentic engine for his year of Beetle. After considerable expense, he soon was cruising with an engine to-kill-for—a real German engine from ring gear to crank pulley.

When he talked to me some months later and announced that he was selling his Beetle and all of his VW things, I was shocked. He told me that he had experienced a problem with his speedometer. Then, there was some other minor problem. These distractions bothered him and resulted in his disenchantment with a vintage vehicle. He plainly told me that he had not expected these things to happen. Clearly he was under the impression that once “restored”, the car was going to run without a hitch.

His has not been the first case I have observed! A person spends thousands of dollars and countless hours laboring to “get it right” only to have little stuff happen—usually when it is least expected and least appreciated—in terms of money, time and inconvenience!

I am a diehard VW fan who doesn’t like break-downs and other mechanical distractions, but I am in there for the long haul! I never have been under any delusion that a restored vintage car is going to be like a brand new car off the assembly line. Nothing is going to work exactly as it did in those days long past. Never!

In an article in the September-October, 2014 Saturday Evening Post, Jeanne Wolf interviewed Jay Leno—known the World ‘round for his vintage car collection and now-famous garage (pp.38-41 and 82). When but a boy, Jay was given a ’34 Ford Pickup to work on. His dad told him that if he could fix it, he could have it. Jay met the challenge and eventually had the truck running. He said about that first challenge: “You sort of learned to respect the machine and how to make it work. That’s probably what really got me into cars. And that’s what has kept me involved in creating my own collection and building the garage.”