Randy Chow’s Barn Find ’67 Beetle

Randy Chow's Barn Find ’67 Beetle
The term “Barn Find” is a bit of an understatement in this case. By the looks of this VW, it’s obvious that Randy Chow is a very talented creative. This ’67 Beetle was created by hand to get that perfect aged look. I’d be honored to drive this car daily. In fact, I’d never even wash it. Would you?

Vintage Volkswagen Fall Foliage Cruise

Vintage Volkswagen Fall Foliage CruiseThis great story was sent over from a customer of Lane Russell, and follower of 1967beetle.com. Just another example of how we are connecting ’67 Beetle owners around the world. And, it’s always good to see my VW pal, Chris Vallone of Classic VW Bugs.

Hello, everyone!
Below are photos and a video of Chris Vallone and I. I took part in the 2014 “Fall Foliage VW Cruise” into the Hudson Valley in New York. It was very well organized and a lot of fun. I had a great time.

Regards,
Sean

Vintage Volkswagen — The People’s Car

Tom

Tom’s article (below) speaks to why I believe 1967beetle.com has a been a successful effort. These cars have such a rich, emotional connection in people’s lives. Kudos to everyone that’s keeping these old gems on the road today.

The people’s car is really about the people, and we had a grand assemblage of people over at my house for a “body-on” party. The ’67 Beetle that my daughter, Becca, and I are restoring, named “Bucky,” was finally going to get its body put back onto its chassis. I know, it’s about a 5-minute exercise, but it seemed a good reason to have a party. The evening got off on the right foot as Tony Mace, owner of Beetle Power in Pleasanton, showed up in his black Baja Bug.

Tony Mace Baja Bug

Then Joe Blackman, owner of Castro Valley Autohaus, and my buddy Matt Brown came driving up in Joe’s beautifully restored 1962 VW Beetle, both of them styling with the top down and arms resting on the doors as the sun sunk over the horizon.

Joe Blackman VW Beetle with Family

We had Italian antipasta and drinks in the garage and everyone was getting acquainted, or re-acquainted. Joe hadn’t seen Tony since the 1980’s when Tony was a young racer and mechanic working at his dad’s shop in Hayward. Joe and Tony are at opposite ends of the VW spectrum. Joe is refined and showroom detailed, and Tony is more effusive and horsepower-driven. They are both extremely knowledgeable about Volkswagen history, and both as honest as the day is long. Tony re-built Bucky’s engine from the ground up, and it’s a masterpiece.

Ignatios Doukakis’s L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle

Ignatios Doukakis's L282 Lotus White '67 Beetle
They say a photo is worth a thousand words. In this case, it might be the most photos of a single submission in the history of 1967beetle.com. Ignatios Doukakis of Greece shares his very special ’67 Beetle restoration story with the world. The ’67 Beetle community is very happy to have you here. (Edited by Jay Salser)

I have loved Beetles since I was a student at Northeastern University, and I always had wanted to buy one. When I returned to Greece, I found a 1950 Karmann Beetle Convertible and began restoring it. Following that car, I had a succession of Volkswagens: a 1963, then a 1971, a 1968 and then a 1969, which became my daily driver.

Finally, I found a 1967!

The car had been owned from new by a doctor. He sold it to me because he could not drive it anymore. Even though I have two other Beetles, the 1950 Convertible and the 1969, the 1967 model was a car that I always had wanted. I started rebuilding it in January, 2013, and completed it in October, 2014.

Τhe engine is the original 1300cc and I only had it serviced. The painting was done by a friend. The upholstery and carpets were replaced, the electrics refreshed and the wheels painted. This is the 1967 that I always have wanted! All that remains is to keep my promise to take the former owner for a ride in my new car! I am very happy that I now own these three cars.

I want to thank my wife and my son for their patience during all of the hours away from them while I was restoring the Beetle.

Vintage Volkswagen Windshield Washer System

FOR SALE: '67 Beetle Washer Bottle Reservoir Decal
One of the features which the Volkswagen Beetle has retained since 1962 is the windshield washer system. Though it has varied in some details, it has remained a pressure operated system. The fluid bottle was to be filled with clear water or a windshield washing fluid which could consist of an anti-freezing-cleaning solution for winter months or for colder climate zones.

This bottle was also marked with either a yellow or red decal. Both are correct. It just depended on what the factory had on hand.

Pressure in 1961 was generated by a diaphragm—the switch was pulled to activate a diaphragm which pulled water from the unpressurized fluid bottle and pushed it through the washer nozzles onto the windshield.

For 1962, the bottle was changed so that it could be filled with liquid, the cap screwed shut and the bottle pressurized by use of a tire pump or some other source of compressed air. The washer hose, of course, changed to accept this pressure. The hose was routed around the gas tank to the passenger’s side and then to the washer switch. The bottle cap (in the Owner’s Manual illustration) was white and knurled.

Helphos was a major manufacturer of the washer bottle (perhaps the sole manufacturer). In the photo below, Logo and other identifying information has been highlighted in black for illustrative purposes only.