Featured ’67 Beetle — Lenny Copp

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Featured ’67 Beetle — Lenny Copp

If you’re like me, rather than counting sheep, you snore to the cadence of a correctly restored ’67 Beetle engine. Many people claim “restored to factory standards.” However, it takes a lot of knowledge of correct VW parts, etc to bring such a thing to life. Lenny Copp and his team over at West Coast Classic Restoration gets the importance of restoring these gems properly. Here’s an example of a L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle he completed. Kudos to Lenny and others around the world that take the extra steps to get the job done right. Die Deutschen wären stolz!

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Featured ’67 Beetle — Dylan Wills

Featured ’67 Beetle — Dylan Wills

Talk about rust. I’m amazed and proud to see what people are bringing back to life. Keep up the good work, Dylan. The ’67 Beetle community is cheering you on.

Hello 1967beetle.com,
A little update. Our convertible is well underway, besides the parts we previously purchased last summer; the parts are stacking up with more on the way. Some of the stuff we have gotten is a good used (Cleaned and painted too! Good for lazy me…) front beam, as ours was both bent, and rusted out. We also decided to upgrade to disc brakes with a wide 5 bolt pattern, because the car will be used in daily service; as well as drop spindles… Yes, I know I know, they aren’t “stock”", but I enjoy them a little lower. New heater channels are en route, and we already have the new pan halves and ‘vert reinforcement rails. We were able to get parts from a ’67 sedan, such as a new front clip, drivers side front quarter panel, and better rear fender wells.

As we were cleaning out the car more, discovering more rust, we discovered some things. First, the original jack. I find this amazing, as the car was in a collision once, and already has a new partial front clip spliced in. I honestly haven’t seen a bug in my area with it’s original jack still in the car. Found random trinkets, old bicycle parts, campaign stickers, couple of corroded batteries (The mud was pretty high in areas, we were scooping and shoveling it out). Secondly, the fact that we are almost literally building this car from the ground up; and we want it on the road THIS SUMMER. The goal is the latest the end of June, paint job or not. I’ve attached a couple pictures to show some of the stuff we have done, and you may see just a hint of the cancer we are repairing; it’s by far the worst one I have ever welded back together.

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Featured ’67 Beetle — Rebecca Maindonald

Featured ’67 Beetle — Rebecca Maindonald

Hello, 1967beetle.com.
My name is Rebecca Maindonald. I live in Austin Texas with my husband Sam. This is me with GiGi, my 1967 beetle. I purchased her for my 31st birthday in January. GiGi comes from a line of ladies who owned and loved her and put some interesting feminine touches in over the years. What sold me on the car was the pink floral upholstery that the previous owner had put in.

I first got bit by the bug when I was 16 years old. My mom and I were driving home one day and we passed by our local greasy VW workshop and saw a bright yellow ’74 super beetle sitting out front for sale. We both fell head over heels in love with it, and after much convincing of my dad that night, we went and bought it the next day. I called that one Becs Bug and drove it religiously as my first car for about 4 years. As cute as it was, that car was a serious lemon. The reverse gear would regularly fail, forcing me to always park in a way that I could pull straight out from. No amount of idle or carb adjustment would make it run without stalling at stoplights in the winter. I’m convinced I was the most skillful 16-year old driver out there with the number of maneuvers I had to master to drive the thing.

My dad was a real worry-wort, and after four years of nail biting, huffing and puffing, and constant grumbling about ‘that bug’ he convinced me to sell it and buy something more reliable-a Chevy Cavalier. It was a mixture of sadness and relief when I watched it drive off with its new owners-a young couple who were going on a cross country road trip. They were going to tow it behind their RV and use it to drive around the town they stopped in. I never heard how they got on!

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Our New Company — Lane Russell

Lane Russell - The Finishing Touches for Your Vintage Volkswagen

If you’ve been to our old store lately, you might’ve noticed something… We’ve moved. But even more exciting, we’ve started a company. Our goal is to offer the highest quality parts available, and fantastic, personal customer service to help you complete your vintage Volkswagen restoration.

Some of the new products we’ve recently added to our offering:

We plan to add unique items to the shop every month. Be sure to sign up for the Lane Russell newsletter to get notified of shop updates and specials.

As a thank you to our loyal readers, we’re offering 15% off your entire order.
Use coupon code 67COMMUNITY. Promotion good through 11:59pm, Sunday, April 13.

Please let us know if there is anything we can do to help you complete your restoration!

Lane Russell

VW Parts — NOS, Genuine, OE, OEM, Aftermarket

VW Parts — NOS, Genuine, OE, OEM, Aftermarket

Richard Davies wrote this fantastic detailed information on how to correctly purchase VW parts. I did some heavy internet archive wayback searching and happened to find cached portions of the no longer live OE Vee Dub site. Luckily, I was able to piece this information back together.

Photos: Stefan Warter
Article: Richard Davies

How to buy VW parts. NOS, Genuine, OE, OEM, Aftermarket. What do these mean?

OE: Original Equipment. This denotes the part was manufactured by one of the many suppliers of parts to assemble your vehicle on the production line. The part will be as good as any item carrying the VW Logo. Examples: ATE and FAG make Brake hydraulics, master cylinders, wheel cylinders, calipers, etc for VW. Bosch makes many of the electrical components; Zimmermann makes brake rotors and drums; Pagid and Jurid make brake pad and shoes; LUK and Sachs make Clutches; Pierburg makes fuel injection parts. Boge and Sachs make Shock Absorbers; Mahle and Kolbenschmidt make engine parts and so on… There are hundreds more OE Suppliers to the Volkswagen Audi Group.

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