June 2015 Posts

Correct Running Board Color Combinations

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Correct Running Board Color Combinations

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Let’s talk about running boards in regards to the ’67 Beetle. Over years of wear and tear, they are often times replaced with the common black version. However, you may not be aware that 1967 was a very innovative year for Volkswagen. A deluxe ’67 Beetle would originally be fitted with running boards and fender beading to match the body paint color. In the event you’re looking to bring your ’67 Beetle back to its former glory, I’ve provided the correct color combinations, as well as a chart illustrating the information. You can download below.

Body color – Running board color

L41 Black – Black – 
Black
L282 Lotus White – Savanna Beige
L456 Ruby Red – Black
L518 Java Green – Black
L620 Savanna Beige – Savanna Beige
L633 VW Blue – Black
L639 Zenith Blue – Zenith Blue
L19K Yukon Yellow – Black
L54 Poppy Red – Black

Note: Colored running board mats were only installed onto deluxe and convertible models, standard models (hardtop and sunroof) were equipped with black mats, regardless of the exterior paint scheme.

Correct Fender Beading Color Combinations

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Correct Fender Beading Color Combinations

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Let’s talk about fender beading in regards to the ’67 Beetle. Over years of wear and tear, the correct fender beading is often times replaced with the common black version. However, you may not be aware that 1967 was a very innovative year for Volkswagen. A deluxe ’67 Beetle would originally be fitted with fender beading to match the body paint color. In the event you’re looking to bring your ’67 Beetle back to its former glory, I’ve provided the correct color combinations, as well as a chart illustrating the information. You can download below.

Body color – Fender beading color                                                    

L41 Black – Black  – 
Black
L282 Lotus White  –  Savanna Beige
L456 Ruby Red – Ruby Red
L518 Java Green – Java Green
L620 Savanna Beige – Savanna Beige
L633 VW Blue – VW Blue
L639 Zenith Blue – Zenith Blue
L19K Yukon Yellow – Yukon Yellow
L54 Poppy Red – Poppy Red

Note: Colored fender beading was only installed onto deluxe and convertible models, standard models (hardtop and sunroof) were equipped with black fender beading, regardless of the exterior paint scheme.

FOR SALE — Genuine NOS German 12V VW Coil

FOR SALE — Genuine NOS German 12V VW Coil Sometimes, “too good to be true” moments actually happen. In this case, it comes in the form of a Genuine NOS German 12V VW Coil we were able to acquire. What makes it even more rare is the fact that it’s in its original box. Nothing makes my heart flutter to the cadence of an air cooled engine more than moments like this.

30-Pict 1 Carb Installation

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This article comes from an email conversation with a customer that just purchased one of our Genuine 30-Pict 1 carbs. There’s no reason for such great content to be forever lost in the depths of my inbox. So.. Let’s talk about how to properly install one. Words by the amazing, Jay Salser.

Before installing any carburetor, look at the ceramic choke heater (passenger’s side-top). There are 3 screws securing the choke ring–which keeps the choke element in its intended position. Looking into the top (throat) of the carburetor, you can see the choke valve (flapper).

Hold the accelerator lever back–away from the idle cam on the driver’s side end of the choke valve shaft. Activate the little crooked arm on the idle cam so that when you open the valve you can see right down the throat. Turn the little arm loose to see where the choke valve will come to rest. This flapper valve wants to be set to close very loosely! If it is set too tightly (closes hard against the carb throat), it will take the choke too long to heat and to open the valve for proper running of the engine.

Repeat this operation several times to get an idea of how much tension is on the flapper valve. If it is closing too tightly, do the following.

Slightly loosen the 3 screws on the ceramic choke element retaining ring. Move the ceramic choke heater slightly clock-wise–to loosen the tension. Turn counter clock-wise to increase the tension. Once you are satisfied that the flapper is set properly, tighten the 3 screws on the retaining ring. DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN! These threads will strip easily. Just tighten firmly.
Genuine Restored 30 PICT 1 Carbs

Hopefully the gasket between the carburetor base and the manifold flange comes with the carburetor.

When you bolt on the carburetor…..you want to snug the carb to the manifold flange but don’t try to wrench it with all of your might. The gasket will be squeezed when you firmly tighten the nuts equally. This forms the air-tight seal which is required.

Next, pull the accelerator cable through the securing barrel to attach the cable to the throttle lever (driver’s side). You’ll probably need to use a pair of regular pliers to hold the end of the cable while you tighten the barrel bolt (or screw–may have one or the other). Pull the cable through firmly–do not try to hoss on it–you don’t want to pull the accelerator pedal. But, you don’t want to leave it hanging slack, either.

Russ Keller’s ’67 Beetle

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Russ Keller is a customer and personal friend of 1967beetle.com. He’s restored a few ’67 beetles, and this one is definitely worth a mention. He also is very handy with Sapphire V radios, if you’re ever in need of having yours serviced. Alright, let’s take a look at this ’67 he saved from a barn.