Featured ’67 Beetle — Kenneth Yeo

Featured ’67 Beetle — Kenneth Yeo

Huge kudos to Jay Salser for his work on this article. It was crafted by Ken Yeo in his own words. Our growth has been amazing, and the fact that these great cars keep surfacing. Slowly, we’re connecting ’67 owners globally.
-Eric

Ken, tell the Readers of 1967Beetle.com a bit about yourself and where you are located.

I’m 40 this year, from Singapore. I’ve owned 4 bugs over the last 20 years, and my current 1967 for the last 15. I’ve had a ’71 1302, ’67 1300, another ’67 1300 and a ’66 1300.

How did you become interested in Volkswagens.

It was my 4 years at the University of Miami, Florida where I first was exposed to beautiful cars and fell for vintages almost immediately. Upon graduation and return to Singapore in 1995, I set out looking for a classic and found the VW bug most affordable, since I was conscripted into the Army and wasn’t paid well. Interest became passion, then obsession, and I’ve always owned at least one ever since.

Your car differs in some respects from those which were directly imported from Germany into the USA. Tell us about some of those differences.

Our ’67s are available only with 1300cc ‘F’ engines (much like the ’66), and retain the sloping headlights. As an ex-British colony, we are right hand drive (RHD). Our bumpers come with over-riders. Rear turn signal lamps are in orange instead of red, and reverse lights are excluded. A little mix-and-match of the US and European models, I would say.

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’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Equalizer Spring Installation

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Equalizer Spring Installation

This article was submitted by reader and ’67 enthusiast Richard (Dick) Diaz. (Thank you very much for your contributions to 1967beetle.com.

I am not sure about this 1967 Volkswagen Bug which I purchased nearly a year or so ago–it has taken over my life! In a positive way I want to add! Luckily for me, I was fortunate enough to stumble across 1967Beetle.com on one of my many trips through cyberspace looking at other 1967 VW Bugs, trying to see what is missing from my Bug.

I have tried hard not to make this project a “checkbook restoration,” but I do have limitations on what I can do myself, how much money I have and how much money my wife thinks I am spending! My rule has been to not try anything that requires a special tool, knowing that I have only so much time on this earth to use special tools and I have used up 66 years of my life to get to this point! I had written an early article for 1967Beetle.com on the purchase of my 1967 VW Bug and what mistakes I made in selecting this particular car. This article, Equalizing Spring Installation, comes at the urging of Jay Salser and Eric Shoemaker of 1967Beetle.com to hopefully help others that may want to pursue a similar project. The Equalizer Spring had been removed from my car when the previous owner lowered the car for the increasingly popular California Look!

This article is about my discovery of, and installation of, the missing Equalizer Spring that Volkswagen had installed in the 1967 year and early 1968 year VW Bugs. To complicate things, the Equalizer Spring goes by many names, making it elusive to what its true function really is: Rear Anti-Roll Bar, Z-Bar and Sway Bar. From what I have read, the Volkswagen engineers had it right the first time! According to Volkswagen’s Official Service Manual, Beetle and Karmann Ghia 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, Bentley Publishers, the Equalizer Spring is a side-to-side torsion bar connected to the axle tubes. It is designed to provide an additional progressive spring action to assist rear torsion bars when under load. The Equalizer Spring was added in 1967 because in 1967 the torsion bar was softened for a softer ride and the Equalizer Spring made up the difference and came into use only when there was a heavy load over the rear axle.

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Featured ’67 Beetle — Steve Parker

Featured ’67 Beetle — Steve Parker

It’s emails like these that make me realize just how much fellow ’67 enthusiast enjoy the labor of love efforts that go into 1967beetle.com.

Thanks for writing Steve, and sharing your fantastic L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle with the world.

Hello, 1967beetle.com.
I’ve been a subscriber to your wonderful site for a while now, the regular emails are always welcome. I thought it about time I shared with you my unique ’67 Beetle story. I own what I believe to be the only U.S spec 1967 Bug in New Zealand.

The car was imported here in 1968 from Washington DC by the owner,Max Bumpers (Cool name huh) who was transferred down-under with ‘Operation Deep freeze’ a long-standing military joint venture between NZ, Australia & the U.S based in Christchurch, to monitor & protect the Antarctic. Most U.S staff bought cars with them as NZ had strict import restrictions in those days, making new cars here very expensive.

The original owner never returned to the U.S and kept his bug until about 2004.

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