Vintage Volkswagen Bulb Repair

Vintage Volkswagen Bulb Repair

A couple of months ago, some of us were having a VW photo shoot. As my wife, Neva, drove away in our ’67 Beetle, someone exclaimed that one of the brake lights wasn’t functioning.

“Again?”, I thought and remarked to those present that I had serviced the offending brake light on more than one occasion. I added that to my list of VW Things To Do.

A couple of weeks later, I had a moment to work on the problem. But, in the intervening time, I had thought of a possible solution. It derived from something having nothing to do with VWs. In fact, this possible solution had nothing to do with anything automotive!

I removed the car’s cover, removed the lens and the offending bulb. I tested it to be sure that it was a functioning unit. Sure was. Sigh. Not as easy a fix as I had hoped. Wouldn’t it have been nice to just replace a burnt bulb?

Usually what I have done in the past is to remove the bulbs, then to remove the bulb holder itself. This is an easy operation requiring the removal of the lens, then the use of a Phillips head screwdriver to remove one short screw at the bottom of the bulb holder. The holder lifts out of its slot and there it is.

For Sale — VolksBaggin Wallets

VolksBaggin Wallet

As we slowly grow Lane Russell, we are always searching for unique items. We’re proud to now offer a small batch of VolksBaggin Wallets. These gems are crafted from OEM VW Beetle and Bus seat/door panel upholstery. A must have accessory for any vintage VW owner. Offered in 10 period correct colors, too!  Handmade in the USA.

As always, thank you for supporting 1967beetle.com.

Vintage Volkswagen Oil Leaks

Hello from Austin, TX. Just a quick mention about fixing oil leaks at the rear main seal, from our good East Coast pal Chris Vallone of Classic VW Bugs.

We all know that VWs mark their spot when it comes to some oil dripping. If you don’t have a drip, consider yourself lucky, or maybe you do not have any oil in your motor! I came across a product recently that can solve the notorious “rear main seal” drip. This is probably one of the most common areas to drip on a VW air-cooled motor.

FOR SALE — L581 Java Green ’67 Beetle

FOR SALE — L581 Java Green ’67 Beetle

Just listed here at 1967beetle.com for Euro Tech, this L581 Java Green ’67 Beetle is a nice car for sure. I don’t see as many Java Green VWs on the market. Also, it’s a sunroof!

We have a GORGEOUS 1967 VW Beetle presented by Euro Tech. This gem is 12 volt and in incredible shape. The paint is in great condition, engine runs fabulous, the tranny shifts smooth, and she drives excellent! The interior is in fantastic condition. Please call Euro Tech for more detailed information about the car.

Status: For Sale
Mileage: 70,023
Location: Wichita, KS
Price: $19,985
Contact: Ron Fortune | (316) 263 – 2247

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Foreword: Rather than to address “undercoating” as a general topic of discussion, I’ve tried to keep the focus upon undercoating as it related to Volkswagens through 1979 and as it relates, now, to the vintage Volkswagen hobby.

Undercoating has around for years and years in the world of vintage Volkswagens.

The theory behind undercoatings is that a barrier could be created to prevent the infiltration of moisture. Undercoatings themselves had no rust-inhibitive qualities. They simply have been intended as a barrier.

VW dealerships sold the service to new car buyers as a preventative measure to guard against rust. It was a money-making operation and dealers loved it. Especially was it offered in the colder climate States and especially where salt was used on icy roadways.

Recently, I spoke with a former VW trained specialist. He described the undercoating procedure as he observed it. He said that the dealership where he worked had one bay with a lift, “in a dark corner”, where the “nasty” undercoating took place. He told me that it was part of a money-making effort by dealerships in the make-ready department. Undercoating was applied using a hose and gun working from a 30 gallon barrel of material.

I have had my doubts over the years about its effectiveness in sealing the undersides of a vehicle as a moisture barrier. Here’s why. I was in the painting industry for almost 30 years. If there is a coating, I likely have seen it or read about it. In my experience, despite all claims to the contrary, coatings will fail. There is no “eternal” coating. I’ve heard claims that “you’ll never have to paint again”. Why can’t this be true?

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

It can’t be true because of expansion-and-contraction problems. When the base material—wood, metal, plastic—expands or contracts, the coating is going to suffer, eventually. Some coatings are better suited than others. But the fact of the matter is that coatings fail.

Metals, especially, are given to fluctuations from heat and cold. They will expand and contract more, and more quickly, reacting to weather and usage conditions.

What’s another problem? It’s the fact that the underside of a vehicle is not a continuous sheet of metal. Not at all. The undersides of vehicles are composed of pieces that have been fitted to form a unit. This could be through a continuous weld or spot-welding or with nuts and bolts and washers. There are joints. Every place where there is a weld or a nuts-and-bolts joint, expansion rates will differ.

As well, the application of undercoatings must completely encase all of this in order to form a viable covering—it must be seamless. This doesn’t happen.

The next issue is that undercoatings historically were shot onto factory painted surfaces. In order for a coating to adhere, there must be the possibility of adhesion. Slick surfaces will not offer such adhesion possibilities. As a result, I have been able to remove portions of undercoatings on Volkswagens simply by using compressed air. Sometimes, I have been able to remove it in sheets, simply because of the lack of adhesion. I can imagine that vibration over the years helps to loosen poorly adhered coatings.