’67 Volkswagen Beetle Snow Day

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Our good friend, Tim Mossman from across the pond shared a few photos from his first ’67 Beetle snow day drive. In his own words.

The snow warning was issued, but I wanted to play. I baby my Beetle and to avoid driving in the rain. But snow? Not sure whether to venture out in the 67, I fired off an e-mail to the mighty Jay Salser of 1967beetle.com and he assured me I would be fine!

img_6016Happy Holidays from 1967beetle and Lane Russell.

The 1967 Beetle Fuel System

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The Fuel System of an air-cooled Volkswagen is not a complicated System.

But, there are some Fuel Issues which continue to plague the VW Community—some of them easily resolved with a little bit of thinking and work. These are things which most of us can do ourselves.

First, rather than running to all of the forums on the subject, it’s time to sit down to consider how the Fuel System of our Beetles works.

CAUTION: When working with Gasoline—ALWAYS work outdoors and away from any source of flame or spark!

The Fuel Tank:

Complaints about Gasoline Fumes are common. Two things usually contribute to Gasoline Odor in the Trunk. This Odor often penetrates to the Cabin area.

Let’s talk about the Tank Filler Neck. Note that there is a tiny Tube coming off the Neck
pointing towards the left side of the car. By removing the Gas Cap and looking into the Filler Neck, we can see the Tube protruding into the inside of the Filler Neck. Where it protrudes, it is slightly pinched. This is to limit the amount of liquid gasoline which can escape through the Tube. A tiny Rubber Vapor Hose (N203531—ID-2.0 mm/OD-3.5 mm) is pushed onto the tube where it exits the Filler Neck. It needs no clamp since it fits tightly and there is no pressure upon it. (Note: Vapor Hose also may be marketed as Vacuum Hose.)

The Vapor Hose loops back towards the driver, then back again to the front of the car where it is pushed through an opening and allowed to dangle several inches beneath the car. Thus, any Gasoline Vapors will exit beneath the car and will not escape through the Trunk area and into the Cabin. If the Vapor Hose is missing or improperly routed—Gasoline Vapors will permeate the Trunk area and pass into the Cabin. Be sure that the Hose is present and routed through the hole to beneath the car. 2 Hose Clips (111-201-261) keep the Vapor Hose stabilized on the Cowling Loop.

If the Tank Filler Neck Tube becomes plugged, gasoline will not flow properly from the Tank Outlet. Also, make certain that the Vapor Hose is not pinched or plugged.

Are My Vintage VW Front Fenders German?

Are My Fenders German?

Not a week goes by here at 1967beetle.com without someone sending photos of their vintage pride and joy, fresh from bodywork and paint. More times than not, their car has an aftermarket front fender. If you didn’t know, the ’67 Beetle front fenders (German) are another one of those fantastic one year only items. If you look at the vintage market, you’ll see plenty of folks claiming, “high end restoration.” However, (sadly) people often use cheap parts for max profit. The power is being able to tell the difference. I’d like to explain how can you tell if you’re dealing with genuine German VW metal. Let’s discuss below, with photos to help illustrate how simple the difference really is. I’d love to know how many readers actually go outside and look at their cars after reading this.

Turn signal holes
This is by far one of the easiest ways to distinguish the real deal from aftermarket. On the right we have a genuine German VW fender. If you remove your top turn signal assembly, the hole punched should be round. On the top of the hole, if you looked close enough you’d also see that the fender is stamped with a VW logo mark. Over time, these are often worn away. However, they are there from the factory. Also, the metal of German fenders is much thicker. On the left, we have an aftermarket fender with a goofy oblong hole. Why the folks making these did not use proper tooling to produce something that matches an OE fender is beyond me.

Are My Fenders German?

L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle

s-l1600-7Hello, ’67 Beetle community. In between typing original VW part numbers into a growing database, I wanted to share this L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle Jay and I were discussing earlier today. One one hand, it looks to be very original; however there are some small things we noticed. (Aside from what appears to be a LOT of rust.)

What do you see? Anything that stands out? This car is currently for sale, however not officially here. Sometimes, I curate when something is interesting enough to have a cup of coffee (iced) over.

’67 Beetle Fuel Hose Clamp Tool

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Fuel filters
When talking about working on the Fuel System of our Beetles, one of the greatest concerns we have is Fuel Spillage.

Gasoline is a wonderful “invention” but one which we should respect because of its evaporative and, thus, flammable qualities. We must use great care when working with gasoline. My number one rule is to work with gasoline outdoors so that gas vapors cannot accumulate

I frequently am asked by fellow Volkswagen enthusiasts what to do about gasoline spillage. This is a valid concern. When changing the fuel hoses, there always is the possibility for some gasoline to be spilled.

THERE IS A BETTER WAY!

While talking with my good 1967 Beetle friend, Frank Salvitti, of Long Island, New York, this past weekend, the subject of fuel spillage came up.

Says Frank—“Oh…that’s no problem! I use Line Clamp Pliers.” Now, Frank is a seasoned mechanic and knows things that a lot of us DIY-ers don’t. I asked Frank to explain his process and he told me that he would send some photos to illustrate his tool of choice.

Over the years, I have seen screws inserted into the ends of hoses, pieces of whittled wood, and other variations, in order to avoid the loss of gasoline while the person is working to change fuel hoses. But it takes time to insert something into the hose. In the meantime, the gasoline is draining. I laugh now, but I recall the many times I was beneath a VW, working on a fuel hose, and had the fuel to drain right onto my face or clothing. Not much way to avoid it if you are working with the fuel hose over head!

Frank emphasized the simplicity of the Line Clamp Tool and how to use it. The beauty is that if anything at all spills, it will be a couple of drops which remain at the end of the hose after it has been clamped. A paper towel can be placed there when the hose is disconnected and will take care of such a small amount.

The Clamp is applied appropriately—THEN—the fuel hose is disconnected.