FOR SALE — L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle Sunroof

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Fresh to the market here at 1967beetle.com, this is a very nice ’67 Beetle sunroof. Marie and I exchanged many emails prior to her listing. Here’s the history of this gem.

I purchased this car in 1977 from the original owner and drove it regularly from 1977 to about 1990. During that period I had the engine either rebuilt or replaced, I cannot remember which. The miles that you see are on the replaced/rebuilt engine. The car has been garaged or stored under cover from about 1988 till today.

From 1990 to about 2002 the car was driven just a few miles a year. In 2002 we replaced the floor pan, made some minor repairs and had it painted. From 2002 to 2005 it was driven locally and regularly. From 2005 to today it has been stored and driven a few miles a year.

Last year at this time I drove it about 20 miles to the VW restoration shop in Madison VA. We choose not to have the bug restored at this time. When we picked up the car from the restoration shop it would not stay running long enough to drive it home so we towed the car home. We have not driven it since, and we believe the engine needs new points, condenser, and plugs.

The sunroof does not work. It has come off its track, and it leaks, which I found out last week while washing it. We have taken the sunroof interior handle off so that it would not be opened by mistake.

The car has been painted several times and is in good shape with just a few chips. The floor pan has been replaced and is solid. The window gaskets have been replaced, though they need to be replaced again. There are a number of things need to be done to the interior if someone wanted to restore the car, including new seat covers, new door panels, and new headliner.

As you might imagine, I have loved this car having owned it for almost 40 years. I would love to find a buyer that would love it now and restore it!

Status: FOR SALE
Mileage: 82,550
Location: Boston, Virginia (Near Culpeper VA)
Price: $7,000 OBO
Contact: Marie Murphy  |  540-247-5442

FOR SALE — Rare ’67 Beetle Parts

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — One Year Only Parts
In the world of ‘67 Beetle parts, we know many are rare and hard to find. Bill wrote earlier about having 1967beetle.com help with some recent gems he’s acquired. From the impossible to find rear bumper overriders to lobster claw seat belts; he’s got them.

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. With that, take a look at what he has for sale below. I’ll mark SOLD as they clear out. Now I’m off to take a cold shower.

Status: FOR SALE

Seat Belts: $300 obo
Rear towel bars: $200 obo
Primed rear deck lid/light cover: $350 (Updated price)

Contact: WJ Burdis  |  724-987-2390

30 PICT 1 Main Jet Configuration

NOS Solex 30 Pict-1 Carburettor

A Volkswagen friend in England recently e-messaged me about a situation with his carburetor. His is a 28 Pict-1 but the situation is identical to that of the 30 Pict-1 carburetor.

The proposed problem deals with the Main Jet of the carburetor.

When my friend experienced some carb problems, he began to search the Internet for helps. He discovered a video and watched it and followed the instructions.

When the video came to the Main Jet installation, the mechanic pointedly explained that the hole in the Main Jet Carrier Bolt should align with the hole in the bowl of the carburetor.

My friend attempted to get the holes to align but was unable to do so. Now, he thought that he had a problem. He asked me if he should not tighten the Carrier Bolt, but leave it a little loose so that the holes would align.

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By not tightening the Main Jet Carrier Bolt, gasoline will seep to the outside of the carburetor, resulting in the problem of raw gasoline in the engine compartment—a problem which none of us wants.

In the Carburetors mentioned above, the brass Main Jet Carrier Bolt also serves as the Plug for the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl. (Later carburetors have a simple steel or brass Bowl Plug. The Main Jet was separated from the Carrier Bolt and moved to a new location but has the same function).

With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt in hand, note that the area which has the holes is recessed—of a smaller diameter than the rest of the Bolt. There are three holes drilled on opposite sides of one another. This is so that gasoline can pass through the hole in the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl and enter the recessed area where the Main Jet Carrier Bolt resides. With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt installed, gasoline in the Bowl can freely circulate around the Carrier Bolt and enter the 3 drillings in order to pass to the Main Jet.

SOLD — L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle Sunroof

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Hello, ’67 Beetle community. You might have noticed that things here have been a bit quiet. My Grandpa hasn’t been feeling well; another story for another time.

Fresh to the market here at 1967beetle.com, we have a really nice L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle for sale. I love seeing a stock vintage VW. We all know these gems are going up in value each year. Here’s the info we have from the seller. Please reach out to him with any questions. Let’s help this ’67 Beetle find the new home it deserves. Did I mention that this ’67 is a sunroof?!

1967 Volkswagen Beetle Classic Sunroof Sedan from Fresno California in 2010. Ruby Red with off white leatherette basket-weave interior and door panels. Headliner in excellent condition. Original 1500cc single port engine s/n # H5348568. Car runs and drives excellent with no smoke or noises. Paint is very nice, was painted around 2009 and was driven very sparingly sine then. Pictures do not do this car justice looks much nicer in person. Car has new wide white radial tires all around. Since I have owned this car I have replaced the interior seat covers and door panels with correct basket weave material, headliner was previously done when painted. Windows have been upgraded: front-ventless style, rear pop-outs. I am moving and reluctantly must sell this car.

Status: SOLD
Mileage: 34,279
Location: Grand Island, NY
Price: Bidding on eBay
Contact: Bidding on eBay

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Foreword: Rather than to address “undercoating” as a general topic of discussion, I’ve tried to keep the focus upon undercoating as it related to Volkswagens through 1979 and as it relates, now, to the vintage Volkswagen hobby.

Undercoating has around for years and years in the world of vintage Volkswagens.

The theory behind undercoatings is that a barrier could be created to prevent the infiltration of moisture. Undercoatings themselves had no rust-inhibitive qualities. They simply have been intended as a barrier.

VW dealerships sold the service to new car buyers as a preventative measure to guard against rust. It was a money-making operation and dealers loved it. Especially was it offered in the colder climate States and especially where salt was used on icy roadways.

Recently, I spoke with a former VW trained specialist. He described the undercoating procedure as he observed it. He said that the dealership where he worked had one bay with a lift, “in a dark corner”, where the “nasty” undercoating took place. He told me that it was part of a money-making effort by dealerships in the make-ready department. Undercoating was applied using a hose and gun working from a 30 gallon barrel of material.

I have had my doubts over the years about its effectiveness in sealing the undersides of a vehicle as a moisture barrier. Here’s why. I was in the painting industry for almost 30 years. If there is a coating, I likely have seen it or read about it. In my experience, despite all claims to the contrary, coatings will fail. There is no “eternal” coating. I’ve heard claims that “you’ll never have to paint again”. Why can’t this be true?

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

It can’t be true because of expansion-and-contraction problems. When the base material—wood, metal, plastic—expands or contracts, the coating is going to suffer, eventually. Some coatings are better suited than others. But the fact of the matter is that coatings fail.

Metals, especially, are given to fluctuations from heat and cold. They will expand and contract more, and more quickly, reacting to weather and usage conditions.

What’s another problem? It’s the fact that the underside of a vehicle is not a continuous sheet of metal. Not at all. The undersides of vehicles are composed of pieces that have been fitted to form a unit. This could be through a continuous weld or spot-welding or with nuts and bolts and washers. There are joints. Every place where there is a weld or a nuts-and-bolts joint, expansion rates will differ.

As well, the application of undercoatings must completely encase all of this in order to form a viable covering—it must be seamless. This doesn’t happen.

The next issue is that undercoatings historically were shot onto factory painted surfaces. In order for a coating to adhere, there must be the possibility of adhesion. Slick surfaces will not offer such adhesion possibilities. As a result, I have been able to remove portions of undercoatings on Volkswagens simply by using compressed air. Sometimes, I have been able to remove it in sheets, simply because of the lack of adhesion. I can imagine that vibration over the years helps to loosen poorly adhered coatings.