Vintage VW Sunroof Rebuild

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Sunroof Rebuild

This article was submitted by reader and ’67 enthusiast Jeremy GoodspeedThank you very much for your contributions to 1967beetle.com.

Starting in 1965 VW changed the sunroof design for deluxe Beetles from a sliding ragtop design to a metal sunroof which requires a crank of a handle to open and close.  Although the sunroof was smaller in overall size, it was much quieter, smoother and more secure than the older design.

As with any rebuilding project, preparation is vital for a successful rebuild.  Although very difficult to find today, I was fortunate enough to have purchased just about every part necessary for the rebuild many years ago.  NOS sunroof parts are just about extinct today, and if you’re lucky enough to find a part, you will pay a heavy price.

1967 Volkswagen Beetle — The People’s Car

Great story, Jay. They don’t call it the “People’s Car” for nothing. It’s these emotional tales between human and old machine that connect us all. As always, thank you so much for your contributions to 1967beetle.com.

Have you heard someone talking about his first car? There’s a certain nostalgia attached to that first automobile—no matter what make of vehicle it might be.

But the stories abound when it happened to be a Volkswagen. And, when it happened to have been a Beetle—a 1967 Beetle…..well, the story just gets bigger right there!

While surfing around the web, I happened upon a video which embodied the best of Worlds—that first car, which, as it happened, turned out to have been a 1967 Ruby Red Beetle.

That’s when the members of a family went underground to produce the birthday present of a lifetime, to surprise a husband, father and grandfather.

1967 Vintage Volkswagen Beetle Z-Bar Update

Russ Keller, a reader and good friend of 1967beetle.com sent the following information with photos to back up his studied position. His thesis called for “loading” the Z-Bar by altering the travel space at the bottom end of each Operating Rod. With the space filled, the Rods are “loaded”. They are not “waiting” for a “loading moment” when the Z-Bar will be activated.

Russ Keller says:

Because the Z-Bar was active only in harder turning as an anti-sway, it was too little too late.

On our ’67, we engaged the Z-Bar all of the time by installing a polyurethane bushing to take up the 2 inch slack prior to engagement. In this way it was always ready in play and we didn’t have the delay in rear suspension stiffness when needed. It was there right away and really improved the cornering and over-steer. Here are a few pictures we took when we installed the z-bar bushings. It was a cheap and easy improvement and the urethane came in black so it matched the look. It was a big improvement for little $$.

After a few hard test drives we experimented with the length of the test bushing.

Because we bought an extra long piece of the hollow material from McMaster-Carr, we could cut test samples. These ranged from 3 1/2″ down to 2″.

The 2″ was the pick by the drivers–my son, “VW Gary” (Gary Drennen from Gary’s Aircooled Service) and me. As I remember, since the 2″ bushing did not quite fill the space on the Operating Rod, that little bit of “slop” prevented the back (of the car) from feeling springy or bouncy. Springy is a technical term of art…..”Federnd” in the original German.”

Thank you, Russ, for sharing your experiment with us!

1967 Vintage Volkswagen Beetle Z-Bar


Jay Salser does it again, folks. Many many ’67 Beetle owners around the world appreciate the fruits of your labor. – ES

At some point, I accumulated some Z-Bar (Equalizer Spring) Components. I decided to sort these and at least learn their Names and Part Numbers. There’s not much future in calling parts—“the thing-a-ma-jig”. You get the picture.

I know that a lot of 1967 Owners won’t be excited by all of this, but there are some who enjoy knowing about the “minutia” of their cars. For those—I decided to post the information which I have accumulated. Thanks to David Brown, I have been able to acquire those VW Part Numbers which I could not find on my own. And, Neva Salser whipped out her Digital and snapped a multitude of photos from which to choose some for this exercise.

Note: The Z-Bar continued into the 1968 Production Year for 1968 Beetles so that the Z-Bar is not a one-year-only part.

In Europe, the Z-Bar took a different configuration. Also, somewhere in there, the replacement for the Z-Bar with which we are familiar was superceded by the one in the photo below.

SOLD — L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle

Listed for our friends over at BaT, this L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle is an example of period correct along with a few modern upgrades. Also, SB12 Headlights! Who’s going to make an offer?

This 1967 Volkswagen Beetle is a restored example powered by a 1600cc dual-port flat-four paired to a 4-speed manual. Purchased in 2015, the seller has carefully finished the restoration by addressing originality details, and has driven it 3k miles since completion. The body was restored and painted in original Zenith Blue previously and shows well with good chrome. The restored interior is in very nice condition with fresh German materials and a working original Sapphire V radio. A complete tune up was just done which also included an oil change, valve adjustment, a Pertronix ignition, and new alternator. It comes with books, receipts from the seller’s ownership, transferable California black plates, and a clean Oregon title.

Status: SOLD
Mileage: 1,300
Location: Oregon
Price: Bidding on BaT
Contact: Bidding on BaT