Brian Eady’s Fontana Grey ’67 Beetle

Thanks for sharing your story with 1967beetle.com, Brian!

My ’67 Beetle Story. WGY 124G was purchased by Mabel Ruth Dench an English Christian missionary working in Sweden.She was visiting friends in Kirkheim Tech near Stuttgart when they offered to replace her aging British car. A visit to Ramperger VW garage in the town resulted in the purchase of a 1967 beetle in Fontana grey on August 7 with just 7 km on the clock. It had just been used as a demonstration model.

The car is mentioned in her book Only A Channel. She drove it back to Sweden then the following year returned to England with the car where it was given a 1968 number plate. She drove the car for the next 30 years into her late 80s.. She then sold it to a member of her church in 1998 who kept the car for 3 years until I bought it in 2001.. 

The 1300 engine was in a poor state as the oil hadn’t been changed in a long time so the engine was replaced with another 1967 engine.In 2018 the car underwent a moderate restoration where all the rust was cut out and a full respray.. The car has never been out of Christian ownership.The car is left hand drive, original upholstery, original 6volt electrics and was one of the last delux 6 volt cars made having been built in July 1967. I still have the original receipt.

The Finishing Touches for Your Vintage Volkswagen™
The Finishing Touches for Your Vintage Volkswagen™

Posted by Eric Shoemaker

Hello, I'm Eric. I started 1967beetle.com. I also own Lane Russell, a leading supplier of VW parts for your classic Volkswagen restoration. I drive a '67 Beetle daily and love to share vintage Volkswagen stories with the world.

  1. Note the fenders front and rear with no holes for support tubes, since only the bumper blades were used on these cars which were destined from the factory for markets other than (for instance) the United States. jay

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    1. I did see that. So interesting, as 1967beetle.com teaches me something new all the time; even after 11 years!

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  2. I’m confused about one thing. You say that you you bought the car in 2001, being what would seem like the 3rd owner from the article. Then you go on to say “The 1300 engine was in a poor state as the oil hadn’t been changed in a long time so the engine was replaced with another 1967 engine.In 2018”. What happened here? Was the car in storage? I’d like personally know more about mileage and why this motor was totally replaced. Was the car never driven since you had bought it etc.

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  3. Richard A. (Dick) Diaz December 29, 2018 at 6:13 am

    Nice to have that history on the car! I always admire someone who keeps a car so long! I know some Americans do, but with our fascination with our cars and technology it is rare for anyone to keep a car for very long!

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  4. The engine was replaced in 2001,the old lady and the next owner who only had it for 3 years hadn’t changed the oil in a long time.She was about 88 when she gave the car up.The oil filter was all clogged so the oil wasn’t being filtered which had damaged the engine.The speedo was only showing 67000 km which is unlikely to be the first time round .I had another engine from an accident damaged 1967 beetle which was rebuilt and put into the car.I do plan to have the original engine restored estimate £2000.In 2018 the bodywork was restored.I hope that clears up the confusion

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    1. This is an interesting situation. First, the air-cooled VW engines came with no oil filter. Each one does come with an oil strainer–a wire mesh strainer which collects large particles only. Unless the engine was allowed to run out of oil, possibly there would be little or no damage in only 3 years. I’ve run across engines where the oil was not changed and fresh oil was added only when the level showed low. I once purchased a VW which had sat for at least 22 years. The engine, when started, had suffered no damage and ran so well that the restorer only tweaked it, painted the tins and ran the engine. I realize that we have only the word of a previous owner of this car–perhaps there were other variables of which we are unaware. When you have the original engine rebuilt, Brian, get a detailed report from the engine builder and let us know what is discovered. You have a most interesting car here, Brian! I am glad that you are its present Conservator! jay

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  5. From what I can remember when the original engine was dismantled this summer one of the valves was damaged I’m told probably because it was run on unleaded petrol without adding any lead additive.Weve had lead free petrol here in UK for over 20 years.The engine was knocking badly.I think that’s the right term

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