Tips Posts

Vintage Volkswagen Windshield Washer System

FOR SALE: '67 Beetle Washer Bottle Reservoir Decal
One of the features which the Volkswagen Beetle has retained since 1962 is the windshield washer system. Though it has varied in some details, it has remained a pressure operated system. The fluid bottle was to be filled with clear water or a windshield washing fluid which could consist of an anti-freezing-cleaning solution for winter months or for colder climate zones.

This bottle was also marked with either a yellow or red decal. Both are correct. It just depended on what the factory had on hand.

Pressure in 1961 was generated by a diaphragm—the switch was pulled to activate a diaphragm which pulled water from the unpressurized fluid bottle and pushed it through the washer nozzles onto the windshield.

For 1962, the bottle was changed so that it could be filled with liquid, the cap screwed shut and the bottle pressurized by use of a tire pump or some other source of compressed air. The washer hose, of course, changed to accept this pressure. The hose was routed around the gas tank to the passenger’s side and then to the washer switch. The bottle cap (in the Owner’s Manual illustration) was white and knurled.

Helphos was a major manufacturer of the washer bottle (perhaps the sole manufacturer). In the photo below, Logo and other identifying information has been highlighted in black for illustrative purposes only.

’67 Beetle Owners Manual

67-owners-manual

The ’67 Beetle owners manual has been mentioned before here at 1967beetle.com. However, a reader (Donna Fischer) was kind enough to send the world a more friendly format. You can now download a PDF of the ’67 Beetle owners manual. Let’s give Donna a big “air cooled” thanks for doing so.

Are there other unique pieces of ’67 Beetle literature you’d like to see here at 1967beete.com? Please chime in below and let us know.

Magura vs VDO Gas Gauge

Magura vs VDO Gas Gauge

Recently, fellow creator of 1967beetle.com, Eric Shoemaker showed me the Magura Gas Gauge from his 1967 Beetle. He has cleaned it to look like new. He reports that his sender unit (in the gas tank) as well as the cover for the sender, are a coordinated set from Magura.

Through production year 1967, Beetles in the USA came with a “grill” to the right of the speedometer on the dash. The mechanical gauge was located there.

My experience with VWs has been limited to living in Texas—mostly in the Dallas, TX area. I have seen Magura gas gauges but never fully investigated them. Most cars which I have seen had the VDO gas Gauge and related parts.

Frankly, I believed that Magura was a replacement gauge. End of story. That “story” now has been shown NOT to be ended! We need Reader response and input about the gas gauge and related parts in your 1967 Beetles! Let’s see what our combined experience tells us.

Here’s some more information to put into the hopper.

The VDO gas gauge for 1967 part number is 113-919-031A (the one which I am looking at is date-stamped 12/66). The cable is always silver colored. The VDO gauge is clearly marked on the face as VDO. The country of origin also is clearly marked as being Germany.

The VDO sender cover plate part number is 113-919-137A. The cover has the VW Logo and a raised VDO. This cover is probably a zinc coating.

I do not have a part number of the VDO sender itself.

The Magura gas gauge (this one date-stamped 6/66) part number is 113-919-031. The cable always is black in color. The Magura gauge face is clearly marked Magura.

The Magura sender cover plate is stamped with the VW Logo and the part number 113-919-137. The Magura crest-logo also is stamped into the cover. The cover is a gold colored coating—possibly cadmium.

Selling a Vintage Volkswagen

Selling a Vintage Volkswagen
Here’s a wealth of information in regards to selling a Vintage VW, from our good friend Chris Vallone of Classic VW Bugs in NY. One of the many things Chris and 1967beetle.com agree on is the lack of photos and information in current market listings. When selling a Vintage VW, it’s an up front investment. Chris explains below.

Let’s also talk a bit about the different types of sellers.

Rear VW Axle Maintenance

Rear Axle Maintenance

Not long after I had reassembled Baby, our 1967 Savanna Beige Sedan, I noticed that the passenger’s rear axle was seeping fluid onto the backing plate. “Rats!” I thought.

And, sighing, I got out the tools and began the task of replacing the axle seal—what else could it be? I had done the “taste test” (not recommended for the weak of stomach). It definitely was not brake fluid. Now, folks, I don’t actually imbibe what I taste—it’s an immediate knowledge and I rinse my mouth of any possible residue. It’s the humble chemist’s unfailing test! Some people get a dab onto the forefinger and by rubbing between forefinger and thumb can sense what type of fluid they are dealing with.

Sure enough…after getting into the bowels of the axle, it was a leaking seal. I fetched a new seal pack from my supplies.