Community Posts

Ron Waller – Congrats!

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A big congrats to Ron Waller from the 1967beetle.com community. Our timing lights are pointed in your direction!

On Saturday November 8, 2004, the 11th Annual “Hearts of Valor Car & Motorcycle Show” was held at the Ahwatukee Community Center (Phoenix) to raise funds for wounded veterans. Ron and Diane Waller took first place in their division, 1951 – 1969 “stock” automobiles. In addition, they won the award for “Sponsor’s Choice,” which was given by Discount Tires for “show favorite.” There were more than 70 cars and motorcycles on display.

Their 1967 VW is the fifth the Waller’s have owned which included a 1960, 1968, 1971 and a 1972. Earlier this year their car also won 1st place at the annual “Bugs-O-Rama” which was held at the Wild Horse Pass Raceway in March. Waller is a veteran himself, serving as a sergeant in the Marine Corps from 1967 – 1971.

Austin Air Coolers – Cedar Park. Dec, 2014

15 - ZJLfpnQAir Coolers – Cedar Park. Dec, 2014
They say a photo is worth a thousand words. With that in mind, I’ll let these do their justice. It was great to see everyone last night at the Austin Air Coolers meet up, and fun to meet other ’67 folks who have been following 1967beetle.com.

Photos: Matt Jackson

Randy Chow’s Barn Find ’67 Beetle

Randy Chow's Barn Find ’67 Beetle
The term “Barn Find” is a bit of an understatement in this case. By the looks of this VW, it’s obvious that Randy Chow is a very talented creative. This ’67 Beetle was created by hand to get that perfect aged look. I’d be honored to drive this car daily. In fact, I’d never even wash it. Would you?

Vintage Volkswagen Fall Foliage Cruise

Vintage Volkswagen Fall Foliage CruiseThis great story was sent over from a customer of Lane Russell, and follower of 1967beetle.com. Just another example of how we are connecting ’67 Beetle owners around the world. And, it’s always good to see my VW pal, Chris Vallone of Classic VW Bugs.

Hello, everyone!
Below are photos and a video of Chris Vallone and I. I took part in the 2014 “Fall Foliage VW Cruise” into the Hudson Valley in New York. It was very well organized and a lot of fun. I had a great time.

Regards,
Sean

Challenges of Vintage Car Ownership

Challenges of Vintage Car Ownership

Before I knew “Jonesie” (not his real name), he had purchased a Beetle which, by all logic, should have gone to the crusher. Never had he revived a car, much less a Bug. But, he had disassembled the car, removed the body from the chassis and proceeded to cut and weld and renew the car.

By the time we had met and become better acquainted, he was driving the vehicle but experiencing some major difficulties due to poor advice which he had received and some poor workmanship from a shop which rebuilt his engine and did some front end work.

I took Jonesie under consideration and introduced him to a bonafide VW mechanic and engine builder. Almost immediately the mechanic identified some of the problems. Together, we began solving and drawing the car out of its slump. It was gratifying to see Jonesie driving and enjoying his car. He talked about it, joined a local club, went on cruises and even was joined by his wife in his forays onto the highways.

I wasn’t surprised when he asked for help to build an authentic engine for his year of Beetle. After considerable expense, he soon was cruising with an engine to-kill-for—a real German engine from ring gear to crank pulley.

When he talked to me some months later and announced that he was selling his Beetle and all of his VW things, I was shocked. He told me that he had experienced a problem with his speedometer. Then, there was some other minor problem. These distractions bothered him and resulted in his disenchantment with a vintage vehicle. He plainly told me that he had not expected these things to happen. Clearly he was under the impression that once “restored”, the car was going to run without a hitch.

His has not been the first case I have observed! A person spends thousands of dollars and countless hours laboring to “get it right” only to have little stuff happen—usually when it is least expected and least appreciated—in terms of money, time and inconvenience!

I am a diehard VW fan who doesn’t like break-downs and other mechanical distractions, but I am in there for the long haul! I never have been under any delusion that a restored vintage car is going to be like a brand new car off the assembly line. Nothing is going to work exactly as it did in those days long past. Never!

In an article in the September-October, 2014 Saturday Evening Post, Jeanne Wolf interviewed Jay Leno—known the World ‘round for his vintage car collection and now-famous garage (pp.38-41 and 82). When but a boy, Jay was given a ’34 Ford Pickup to work on. His dad told him that if he could fix it, he could have it. Jay met the challenge and eventually had the truck running. He said about that first challenge: “You sort of learned to respect the machine and how to make it work. That’s probably what really got me into cars. And that’s what has kept me involved in creating my own collection and building the garage.”