Community Posts

Todd Van Winkle’s Standard ’67 Beetle

Hello, friends. My apologies for not being able to showcase the backlog of so many great ’67 Beetle stories from around the world in a more timely manner. Growing a business is a lot of work!

Let’s shine some light on Todd’s Standard Beetle, which is a follow up from Jay’s earlier mention of David Brown’s “standard standard.” Speaking of Jay, lets all give him a round of applause for keeping the lights on here at 1967beetle.com, so to speak. Thanks, Jay! We appreciate and admire your knowledge and never ending love for the ’67 Beetle community.

I had painted a friends bug some years back, he gave me this strange 67′ as payment. I went to look at it, I noticed oddities about it that were not standard issue on a regular 67. I couldn’t quite put my finger on it, but she was definitely not as nice as the 67 we had when I was a teen.

The first thing I noticed was the floor covering, any beetle enthusiast knows of the rubbery type bumpy covering attached to the back seat and in the luggage area. This material was covering the heater channels, and the kick panels, also covering the chassis hump. Definitely no square weave here!

Littler strange things I noticed… One horn grill…A fuel reserve lever like my 56′ has..only one sunshade, and a cool little white plug where the hole is. No Wolfsburg crest on the horn button, just a black disc is fitted. No chrome strip on the glovebox, no ring around the speedo. Only a partial headliner is fitted, not covering the pillar posts or underneath the side windows, just a gray length of plastic covering the seam on the pillar. It just looked so cool with more original paint showing than usual.

I had to research this strange bug. She was a “Sparkafer”, or Standard beetle. No frills with this car! Somewhere I had read that there was a recession in Germany in 67, and Mr. Heinz Nordhoff just had these Standard, cheaper bugs built just to get a product out of the doors, and money for the company!!

She needed a complete resto, I did everything myself in my little one car garage…floors, heater channels, bodywork, built the 40 horse engine..and I painted it the original Ruby Red.

Joy’s 1967 Volkswagen Beetle Sedan


Joy owns a wonderful 1967 Beetle Sedan.

Eric and I have been with Joy for the entire drive….. meaning—

When Joy was searching for a ’67 Beetle in early 2014, she sent photographs of several Bugs to us. We would critique the cars and Joy would move on to the next car. The search continued until September, 2014.

She almost bought one Beetle—until the owner finally confessed to some major difficulties with the vehicle (you couldn’t drive the car for more than 15 minutes at a time or the engine would shut off!).

Finally, just when it seemed that all options had been exhausted, Joy decided that she should look at the L 633 Dark Blue Bug in St. Monica, California. Joy’s least favorite color, she told us. But the car had good provenance. It was not rusted. It was not wrecked. And it had had great care from the three previous owners.

The Bug had passable paint but needed some renewal in order to be driven safely.

The Seller allowed Joy to take the car to a shop for evaluation. The car passed scrutiny and Joy became the new owner.

Since purchasing “Monica”—as she now is named—Joy has had the car repainted, staying with the factory color.

The Birth Certificate certifies that Monica was built, February 16 of 1967 and left the factory March 28th destined for the USA. In addition, the Birth Certificate verifies that Monica has her original factory engine!

With the car now having been renewed mechanically and cosmetically, it was time to get Monica into a Volkswagen Show. Monica took First Place in the Kelly Park Vintage VW Car Show in April of 2017.

Joy and a good friend, who owns a later model SuperBeetle Convertible, are ready to participate for a day’s drive in July’s Treffen Border-to-Border Cruise.

The 1967 Beetle Community — Always Growing

This makes me so happy to read. Thanks, Jay for meeting and helping another ’67 owner! Congrats, Jessica and Charlie. -ES.

Friday, Neva fielded a telephone call from a lady saying that she needed a speedometer for her 1967 Beetle. She left a note on my desk so that I could call when I came into the office
Jessica informed me that she and Charlie had acquired a 1967 Beetle which needed a few things, including the aforementioned speedometer.

Then, Jessica said something really funny! She said…..”She’s suffering an identity crisis!” I began to laugh—it was hilarious. After I calmed, Jessica told me that “she” is “Gertrude” her newly purchased ’67 Bug. We talked a bit about naming Beetles—which thing is what my Neva is good about doing. And—laughed some more!

Well…the “identity” problem stemmed from something which the seller had told Jessica at the time of sale. The seller gave the impression that the car might be a ‘70s Model. After doing some research about VINs, Jessica looked at the aluminum VIN Plate behind the spare tire. It read 117….. “But,” reasoned Jessica…”might this not be a ’70s VIN?”

In order to get to the bottom of the matter, we discussed the other Factory VIN, beneath the rear bench seat. I told Jessica that both Auto VINs should agree and that they certainly should match the Title VIN.

When Charlie and Jessica visited this morning, the first thing which Charlie and I did was to remove the rear seat and clean and chalk the Chassis VIN. Sure enough, it agreed with the Aluminum Tag VIN behind the spare tire. Both gave proof that the car is, indeed, a 1967 Beetle Sedan.

Overnight, after our Friday conversation by phone, Jessica also had done some study of VINs on thesamba.com and had an idea of the Manufacture Date of the vehicle, assuming that it was a ’67 Bug. In fact, Jessica continued to amaze me with facts which she had been learning during her study about her Gertrude!

Michigan Vintage Volkswagen Club Show — Gavin LaMaide


Our good friend, Gavin LaMaide sent this gem over earlier this morning. It looks like he had a great time with the Michigan Vintage Volkswagen Club! Thanks to all around the world that support Lane Russell.

As Jay and I always say, it’s the ’67 Beetle community that makes 1967beetle.com what it is. Thank you!

The 1967 Beetle Community; Yet Another Chapter

Great article, Jay. It makes me so happy to see how the ’67 Beetle connects and is loved by so many people around the world. -ES

I received a phone call–the Caller ID listed it as “Private Caller”
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It rang once–then twice and I answered it. This was the pattern for robot calls.
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I said: “Hello!” Nothing.
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I usually give these calls two opportunities to respond, so, I again said: “Hello!”
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A voice said: “Jay”
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“Yes–who is this?” I replied.
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“This is David Brown.”
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I said–“David Brown from Pennsylvania?”
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“Yes–I’m in Garland.” The bombshell.
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“Are you kidding?”
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“No–I’m here at Jackson and Market Place. How close am I to your place?”

It was, indeed, David and Melody Brown. They’d driven from Pennsylvania and were here.

But, let’s back up a bit. Readers of 1967beetle.com often see a reference to David Brown in my Articles. That’s because I have depended heavily upon David, a VWoA trained Parts Manager who worked for various VW Dealerships in the Pennsylvania area. Later, David opened his own VW repair shop and worked on VWs for 30 years.

David possesses VW Parts Catalogs which have furnished vital information for several Articles. Not only so, but David’s extensive knowledge of Volkswagens across the spectrum is awesome. He has supplied critical information relevant to 1967 Beetle operation and maintenance.

It came as a shock a couple of years ago when David told me that he and Melody would be leaving the Old Home Site, retiring from the VW repair business. What??? What was David going to do with his time. What would happen to his tons of vintage and NOS parts. And his VWs? And his tools and machinery? This became a hot topic between us.

As time passed, David told me that he’d like for me to have his Sun Distributor Testing Station. We talked and laughed about it. 1500 miles lies between us. But, we could dream. David called the machine “your machine” when we talked. And, we dreamed. And we laughed.

Now…here they were—in our neighborhood. I told David to stay put—that I’d be there in a jiffy. I jumped into our car. As I sped along, I made plans for their stay with us and what we’d do the next day and the next. I pulled into the parking area and we met. I’d never even seen anything more than a very distant, blurred photo of David. We shook hands—we embraced. This was a momentous occasion.