Community Posts

Hella SB-12 Headlight Rings

Along with the many other interesting things about the 1967 Volkswagen Beetle are the Head Light Rings Engraved with Hella SB-12. The SB-12s first were used by Volkswagen on Type 3s—the FastBacks and SquareBacks which came to US Dealerships.

Then for reasons unknown to us today, Volkswagen decided to install these special Head Light Rings on early ’67 Beetles—only those manufactured from August–October of 1966. The validation of this information has taken many years of checking the VINs of original, unrestored ‘67s which had SB-12s installed.

If you want to check to see when your ‘67 Beetle was manufactured, go here.

You also will be able to check your Engine H0 Case Serial Number to see how close it is to your VIN.

In today’s world, you will find SB-12s installed on a lot of ‘67 Bugs no matter what month the car was manufactured. Unless you are a purest, it really doesn’t matter if they came with the car, or not. They are very cool to have installed and finding a good set these days is getting harder all the time.

As we all are aware, Volkswagen made a lot of Beetles. However, the ’67 Beetle is the milestone year sought by collectors. It has been said that you either love or hate ‘67s. It really depends on how many of those one-year-only parts are already on the car when you acquire it and how many you have to chase down.

The bottom line is–if you have SB-12s on your ‘67 and it is an early ’67, great. If you have them installed on a later ‘67, enjoy them, because they are not easy to find these days and that is one of the first things folks look for when they are checking out a ‘67.

Wie Ist Der 1500 – 1967 Volkswagen Beetle


Readers of 1967beetle.com from around the world often submit interesting and historic literature. Just when I think we’ve seen it all, something new arrives. My Great Grandfather arrived in the USA from Germany long long ago. Sadly, I don’t speak a word of the language. Err, Das Wolfsburger?!

Can anyone provide context to this piece of ’67 Beetle history? If so, chime in below.

James Mitchell’s L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle

My first experience with 1967 Volkswagens was as a kid in the early ‘70s. My Dad got a Navy-colored Sunroof ‘67 Beetle from a friend. It had been rolled down a mountain, but it still ran and drove, even though every panel on it was in ruin.

Dad then picked up a Sunroof ‘64 that had experienced an engine fire. His plan was to swap the ‘67 motor into the ‘64, but he never got around to it. Me and my siblings played in those cars for years until some neighborhood teenager bought them for parts. My 1967 VW brings back many fond memories—I still remember that cool wooden Formula Vee shift knob Dad’s Bug had.

I had been looking for an older Bug for a while when this one came up for sale about 75 miles away. Rust-free Bugs are hard to come by on the East Coast but supposedly this was a West Coast car. The original Owner’s Manual showed service stamps from VW dealers in CA and OR, and there was a CA college parking sticker on the rear window, which helped to confirm her origin.

She was super solid underneath, and although shabby, she did run, drove well, and was fairly complete. The previous owner (PO) had just replaced the transaxle with one out of a ‘67 Ghia, and mentioned that the clutch was sloppy and needed adjustment. When I got it home it turned out the real problem was the clutch cable tube which had broken free inside of the tunnel at all three welds. But with a bit of careful welding and fabrication of new mounts, I was able to fix it, and she now shifts as good as new. I asked the PO to include the original transaxle in the sale. I now suspect that nothing was wrong with it as the clutch cable tube may have been the root of the problem Maybe one day I’ll get it back in.

The engine ran “ok” when I bought it, and the heads under the valve covers were very clean (which indicated a low mileage motor), but she really lacked power. I found that her distributor was allowing only 12 degrees of maximum advance, so I swapped it for a new one with electronic ignition that gave 25 degrees advance, all before 2700 rpm. I also found that the throttle cable was allowing only 2/3 of the required travel, so that was adjusted too. The carb jetting also was very lean, especially for having a header, so I rejetted the carb with fatter jets, performed a complete tune up and adjusted the valves.

1967 VW Beetle Community


I tell people all of the time that the Vintage Vehicle Hobby revolves around people. It’s more than just a hobby—it’s a Community! PEOPLE drive these Vintage Volkswagens.

When I attend a Volkswagen Show, I go for talking to people about as much as I go for seeing the cars. Really! For me, it is a non-stop talk-a-thon. I’m really worn out from talking, interacting and listening to all of those VW Community PEOPLE!

It was Neva’s and my pleasure this week (1/8/18) to have a visit from Ron Waller of Phoenix, AZ. Ron has visited us once before, about a year ago. He and his wife are in Texas with family but he took time to drive over to spend time with us, as well.

We had a blast! And, we didn’t nearly exhaust the subjects, including, of course, all things Volkswagen.

One of the major topics was Ron’s and Diane’s experience on the Border-to-Border Treffen Cruise down the West Coast of the USA, which they experienced not so long ago. And, what an experience! I read and re-read Ron’s account of the trip—but to hear it in person was something else!

“I really want to do this Cruise”—that theme kept going through my mind. Ron and Diane were the only ones to drive the entire route in a Beetle, their 1967 Lotus White Bug.

I listened as Ron recounted their preparations. They worked with a local VW Specialist in the Phoenix area. They checked and re-checked the car. They made up lists of supplies. When the time came, they were ready! And, then some.

I watched Ron’s face as he traced the route in his words. Some difficult times, some really great times, some frustrating times, some times when they wanted to do a victory lap! If you have driven a Vintage Volkswagen much, you know the feelings herein described.

We had a grand time visiting but, all too soon, Ron had to get back to family.

Don Hoopers’s vintage VW Uni-vents

From time to time, we’re lucky enough that our awesome readers randomly share gems such as these with 1967beetle.com. Very nice. I mean, NICER! Thanks to Don Hooper for sending this interesting piece of vintage VW history our way.

Now that I have spread the word amongst the 1967 Beetle community about my 40 year affair with my 67 Beetle Type 151 Cabriolet, I thought maybe some would enjoy looking at some parts I bought years ago.  I wonder how many here were aware that an in-cabin fresh air ventilation system was available for their 1967 Beetle? Well, it was available as an aftermarket, owner or dealer installed accessory know as the Uni-Vent Air Ventilation System.   Produced by Uni-Vent Co. Inc. of Jacksonville FL and sold by authorized VW dealers, the kit included a plastic tubular vent pipe system with scoops for each horn grill, that routed up inside the inner fenders to 2” holes punched into the kick panels on sedans and Karmann Ghias.  Two round vents units with spring loaded rotating caps closed the system or allowed for air to be directed up, down or sideways in the foot wheels.  The assembly was not made to fit the unique convertible kick panel shape.

I bought my NOS set from Bob Scott at Vintage Parts in Glendale, CA in January 1985 for $80 plus tax, intending to install it in my daily driver 1967 Lotus White sedan.

My plan was to make my daily 40 mile drive on Los Angeles Freeways through hot summer months more tolerable.    I know from the literature included that the set was extremely effective and would have made a big difference in my drives, but I never got around to doing the installation before I sold the car.   Hence the set has sat on a shelf in my garage for the last 32 years.  I thought it might be enjoyable for others who actually drove their 1967 beetles daily to travel back in time through this story and these pictures and remember sweltering days puttering along in the slow lane in the San Fernando Valley or elsewhere in obsessive heat. What a joy those days were!