Jay Salser Posts

DIY Vintage Volkswagen Tow Bar Pins & Clips

DIY Tow Bar Pins and ClipsI run constant ads for used tow bars. Not only so but I keep a sharp eye for tow bars at swap meets. Sometimes, I get lucky.

If I get a tow bar which is missing the Pins and Clips, or the Pins are rusted, I make my own from what I can obtain at a good hardware or one of the large “box” hardware stores.

I purchase J-Bolts/Anchor Bolts from the hardware or builder’s section for these. When Neva and I went recently to buy one for this article, we found them in the nail section of a large “box store” in the hardware department. Buy J-Bolts which are galvanized to prevent rusting. (2 of these cost me, including tax, $2.32)

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Anchor Bolts are used for slab foundation buildings. When the cement is still wet, these are inserted with the bent piece down. The threads remain showing. When the cement has dried, the sill plates and other plates will be bolted to these J-Bolts.

Buy J-Bolts which are longer than what you need. I purchased Bolts that are just shy of 8-1/4th inches in length. This way, the threads can be removed so that you can drill the Holes for the Hitch Pin Clips–which also can be purchased at these same stores. A pair of Clips cost me $1.30, including tax.

The Hitch Pin Clips which I use are 5/32nds of an inch in diameter by 2-15/16ths inches long (measure on the straight side) and are bright plated.

Each Bolt comes with a large washer and nut. These can be put with your other saved-for-that-obscure-project parts.

Richard Marcoux’s ’66 – ’67 Hazet Tool Kit

'66 - '67 VW Hazet Tool Kit
I have had contact with Richard Marcoux (Nebraska) for some years. Richard is well-known for his pristine 1967 Beetles, although he also has had other years of Beetles. Richard has collaborated in several articles with information about parts and operation especially of the ’67 Convertibles. It is a pleasure to have contacts, such as Richard, in order to pin down some of these difficult-to-find facts. In this article, Richard provides absolute information regarding the much sought Spare Tire Tool Kit. One thing which we can take home from Richard’s experience is never to give up the search! His Kit apparently never has been used and represents a bench-mark opportunity to view an unmolested Kit. Richard explains how he came to own this Kit:

With owning a couple of ‘67s, I was used to looking for all those one year only parts. Like all car guys, part of the fun with this hobby is the hunt and finding those special items we are always on the look-out for. The ‘66/’67 Hazet Tool Kit is kind of the same thing. For several years I looked for an NOS kit. I had located several ‘66/’67 kits in all kinds of conditions.

Well… after several years of looking, this one showed up on eBay and it became mine.
The following inventory and pictures detail the contents of the kit.

’67 Beetle License Plate Bracket

License Plate BracketI was choosing a License Plate Bracket for a customer’s 1967 Beetle. Not having focused particularly upon this part, I first examined the Bracket on my own ’67 Beetle.

I did so upon the premise that my car’s equipment is original and correct. So, I performed my examination. Then, I went to my storage and selected the bracket box where I found several—some identical to my own Bracket and some a bit distinctive.

I choose one which was in the best condition. It is of aluminum and had the least bends in it due to years of usage.

Beth Leverman’s ’67 Beetle Bumper Score

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We’ve been following Beth Leverman’s efforts at restoring her 1967 Beetle Sedan. I thought that the following was funny and unique enough to relate to 1967beetle.com.

Beth was out on a jog when she spied a garage sale along her route. Beth has been more of a big car person over the years until she caught the VW Bug. Seeing that there were automotive parts in the sale, she stopped and had herself a look.

Eventually she spied a VW bumper beneath a table. Upon closer inspection, she realized that it was a rear bumper. And…not only so, it was a correct 1967 rear bumper with the correct over riders.

She asked about the bumper “under the tables”. It was “Oh, that one?” sort of a thing. Beth said that “…those goofy guys didn’t want that Volkswagen part mixed in with their American parts…” so they had put it under the table.

They told her “$25 dollars.”

Beth couldn’t get her money out quickly enough. She latched onto that bumper and headed home. Herr Schmidt soon was adorned in proper style. I approve, don’t you?

I asked if she felt guilty enough to go back to give the guys a little extra for the part. She just smiled her sly little Beth Smile.

Kenneth Yeo’s ’67 Beetle

Featured ’67 Beetle — Kenneth Yeo

Taking a look back into the archives, this story deserves another moment in the spotlight.

A Huge kudos to Jay Salser for his work on this article. It was crafted by Ken Yeo in his own words. Our growth has been amazing, and the fact that these great cars keep surfacing. Slowly, we’re connecting ’67 owners globally.
-Eric

Ken, tell the Readers of 1967Beetle.com a bit about yourself and where you are located.

I’m 40 this year, from Singapore. I’ve owned 4 bugs over the last 20 years, and my current 1967 for the last 15. I’ve had a ’71 1302, ’67 1300, another ’67 1300 and a ’66 1300.

How did you become interested in Volkswagens.

It was my 4 years at the University of Miami, Florida where I first was exposed to beautiful cars and fell for vintages almost immediately. Upon graduation and return to Singapore in 1995, I set out looking for a classic and found the VW bug most affordable, since I was conscripted into the Army and wasn’t paid well. Interest became passion, then obsession, and I’ve always owned at least one ever since.

Your car differs in some respects from those which were directly imported from Germany into the USA. Tell us about some of those differences.

Our ’67s are available only with 1300cc ‘F’ engines (much like the ’66), and retain the sloping headlights. As an ex-British colony, we are right hand drive (RHD). Our bumpers come with over-riders. Rear turn signal lamps are in orange instead of red, and reverse lights are excluded. A little mix-and-match of the US and European models, I would say.