Jay Salser Posts

Tom Parson’s L282 Lotus White ’67 Vert

Tom Parson's L282 Lotus White '67 Vert

Thomas Parsons has been a Reader of 1967beetle.com for some time. Tom lives in the small town of Strathroy, Ontario, Canada, between London, Ontario and Port Huron, Michigan, USA. Tom is well acquainted with vintage vehicles having restored other vehicles, including a wonderful Deluxe Model A Ford Coupe. He has attended many shows in Michigan, New York and in Ontario. Nowadays, he participates mainly in local cruises and car shows. Here’s the story of Tom’s 1967 Beetle Convertible.

I have learned a few things over the years, as we all have. Time, money, family and learning all impact our work for sure.

When I brought this car home, the body actually was in two pieces with the doors thrown inside along with many other parts. I picked it up on a flat-bed trailer–the body and parts were piled on one end and the chassis with motor on the other end.

When my wife saw the ’67 come home, she thought I had lost my mind. “You paid money for those parts?” I had taken on difficult projects before but she wasn’t convinced about this one, for sure. It was indeed rough. I have seen much better donor cars in my few travels to Florida over the years since I bought the car. Other than some work on the heater channels, the car simply had been disassembled and left in a heap behind a grocery store in London, Ontario, Canada. I had worked in the summer to help rebuild that store to another chain’s specs, so I shopped there for awhile even though it was not close to our home. I spotted the Beetle one day and drove around for a closer look. I suppose that anybody in his right mind would have run, but like Charlie Brown, I somehow felt that this car needed me! I found out who owned the parking lot it was left in, contacted the owner, paid his price and carted it all home!

Wish I had early pictures to share. The task was daunting but I always had wanted a ‘67 Cabrio–so the work was worth it. Some heater channel repair had begun but was poorly done. I think that the owner had been waiting for someone to come along so that he could unload this pile of parts!

I read a post, a few years ago, by someone who had purchased a “basket case” ‘67 Cabrio. I looked at the pictures and began to chuckle. The car needed a complete restoration but the body was intact. At one point early in my restoration, I had the complete body and doors and most parts of my car piled into a 4 X 4 foot space in the corner of the garage while I worked on the chassis! THAT was truly a basket case. I know what scratch-build means and, as I said, I did not have, at the time, the connections and support that 1967beetle.com provides. You are making a genuine difference to fellow enthusiasts.

Jesse Stovall’s L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle

FOR SALE: L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle

Editors note: FPO image, as we didn’t have photos yet from Jesse. However, wanted to share his story with the world. Once we have them, we will update and showcase. Thanks, Jesse for your contribution!

I learned about 1967beetle.com “late” while owning my 1967 Ruby Red SunRoof Beetle.

I won her in an auction in Colorado. The car had rust in the running boards and a few paint bubbles. No big deal. I bid a little over my limit and won. I am the third owner…the first two were in the same family.

The car came with the original owner’s manual with all of the service notes. Taking all things into account, I believe that this car (at the time of this writing) has a legitimate 62,602 miles. The first owner was an older gentleman who liked to collect cars. When his son was in college in California, he allowed him to use the car.

Although I was able to drive her home, due to sitting awhile, the car needed some engine work. I took her to Painters Grinding (an unlikely name but really good VW folks) and they rebuilt the engine, painted the tins and gave her back to me.

I moved out to DC, due to a job change, and drove her as a daily commuter vehicle. The horrendous roads here tore up the front suspension and I had it rebuilt by my faithful VW wizard mechanic.

After a pretty bad rear end accident in her car, my wife asked me not to drive the VW as my daily car. She made sense. Had I been in the Beetle, I’d be a distant memory.

As a result, I parked her for awhile and had no real idea what to do. I was contemplating selling her on Samba or Craigslist, due to living in DC with a crazy commute. I finally pulled it out of my garage and said “Nope. I’m driving this thing”. And I do. I love the car.

I have been doing a slow and continuing garage restoration–moving the fuel filter, replacing the fuel hoses, etc. Minor brake maintenance and some new tires came next.

’67 Beetle Turn Signal Problems

390634968_41fd3314a2_oI received an e-message from 1967beetle.com Reader and Author Joy Rabin, of California. She copied to me a message from Ryan Pettit of The Big Island in Hawaii. Ryan’s question—where to find some good front fender turn signal bulb holders for his 1967 Beetle.

BACKGROUND

From 1964 through 1967 the front fender turn signal housings are essentially identical—identical lens cover, identical lens, and almost identical bulb holder—EXCEPT that the bulb holder is fitted for 6 volt application 1964 through 1966 and for 12 volt in 1967. The bulb holder for 1967 has two terminals because the parking/running light has moved from the covered head light bucket to the turn signal. The bulb holder now had two electrical spades and the bulb had two filaments.

1968 through 1969 turn signal housings are, for all practical purposes, the same as for 1967 except that each chromed lens cover is cut-back on the sides to reveal the bulb’s light as a “side-marker”. To accommodate to this new lens cover, the lens is fabricated to fit the contour of the new lens cover.

THE PROBLEM

It is my studied conclusion that the bulb holder reflectors for ’67 through ’69 are less robust than for previous years. This comes into play later in this exercise.

Ryan, Joy, and her husband Gary, and I looked around the Internet for replacement bulb holders for 1967 Beetles. I spent time speaking with the representatives of 3 major vendors. All agreed that no one today manufactures an identical replacement for the 1967 through 1969 bulb holder.

In fact, today’s replacements have only one electrical prong for the bulb holder’s single filament bulb (according to what I found). This thwarts the reasons for the twin filament which was new for 1967. And, it is just plain maddening to those of us who want our cars to be correct!

’67 Beetle Ignition Points

DistributorPointsJNow and then in the World of Volkswagen Parts, a New Old Stock (NOS) Part will surface.

Recently, I purchased some 113-905-205K Distributor cores in order to try to resurrect them for selling. This Distributor is pertinent to Beetle years 1966-1967. The seller generously included a set of NOS Ignition Points with the cores.

It’s always exciting to look at Volkswagen history. And, here was a bit of it in my not-so-sweaty hands.

The Points are in their original German packaging. The box reads: “Original Ersatzteile”—meaning “Original Spare Parts”. (Read: Original Replacement Parts)

Vintage VW Running Board Restoration

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Editor’s Note: A huge thanks to Joy Rabins for her contributions to 1967beetle.com. This is one of the most complete articles we’ve ever featured. Our timing lights are pointed in your direction, Joy!

The running board project had been on my list of things to do since I purchased my bug the year before. The surface of the boards looked ugly. There were lumps and bumps of rust under the rubber mats which made it look like it had the worst complexion ever. After doing some research on the web, mostly through YouTube, I thought it was time to tackle the job. Somehow the YouTube videos always make a project look a lot
easier than it turns out to be. Many tend to skip over problems areas as I found out when I did my project.

My cars running boards are original and I wanted to keep them as original as possible. The only parts that I would eventually purchase and replace were the rubber mats, the rubber washers between the running board and fenders, and the clips that hold the molding to the running board. I was able to clean all the original metal washers, bolts and nuts and reuse them.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t until after I had started the project that Jay Salser suggested I write an article on my experience resurfacing my running boards. Therefore, I don’t have a photo of my old running boards attached to the car. I did take a photo of the rubber mat after it was removed from the board. The first photo, “top side of mat”, shows all the bumps where the rust raised the area of the rubber mat. The “Underside of mat” photo shows the rust attached to the underside of the rubber mat.