Jay Salser Posts

Eric Lindemann’s ’67 Beetle

Eric Lindemann's '67 BeetleHello, 1967beetle.com.
I’m new here. I love the stories that people tell about their cars. I guess it’s my turn to tell you about “The White Knight”.

It was 2002, and I was living in Georgia and my brother was living in New Jersey. He talked me in to coming to stay with him so that he could teach me to do on the computer what he does for a living. I am more of a hands-on type of guy, not so much techy, but I was willing to learn. He had me working and it was getting close to lunch time. He told me keep working while he got into the shower.

Well I hit a snag and while I waited for him I thought, “Let me look at the local classifieds for VWs, (not the samba).”

I came across a few but one really spoke to me: 1967 original owner Bug lotus white– no pictures, just the ad. I looked at a few others but saw nothing special.

My brother and I went to Panera Bread and had a nice lunch, and I told him about the 67. He told me to show him when we got back to the house. I went back to the Site and it was gone, but, thank God, I had written the # down. I called the # and Dwight King answered the phone and seemed a little flustered that I was calling about the car. He said that the ad was up for less than an hour and his wife Alice broke down crying that she couldn’t sell a member of the family. But he said it must be fate that I saw it. So he agreed to meet me where the car was stored.

Eric Lindemann's '67 Beetle

’67 Beetle License Plate Bracket (Update)

67bug6a-1Looking further into my “box of brackets” I found one which I inscribed at the time I removed it from a 1967 Beetle decklid. In fact, it is written in marker and also scratched into the aluminum. This makes me know that I wanted to be certain to preserve its identity, even though I cannot recall the actual removal of the Bracket.

This Bracket affixes directly under the two outside studs of the license plate light housing. I suppose that all three of the stud nuts could be loosened sufficiently so that the Bracket could be inserted—all without complete removal of the housing—and the nuts tightened to secure the installation.

In the second photo, I note a potential weakness of this style of Bracket. The constant vibration of the plate, especially with the added weight, if there is a plate frame attached, may eventually fatigue the aluminum and it begins to crack at either end at the bend. Or…it could be that an owner kept bending the plate/Bracket to get the plate at the right angle or, perhaps, to keep the plate from vibrating against the decklid and destroying the paint.

30 Pict-1 Carburetor Differences

Genuine Restored 30 PICT 1 Carbs

Digging into the archives here at 1967beetle.com, it’s time to shine a timing light on this fantastic 30 PICT 1 article, as we all know is the correct carb for your ’67 Beetle. A huge thanks to Jay Salser for all he does for 1967beetle.com.

I have been driving and working on ’67 Beetles for over 37 years. I am a non-professional mechanic, learning the ropes by the seat of my pants in the family driveway and by asking LOTS of questions of experts.

Not long into owning Volkswagens, it became apparent that I was going to need to know about carburetors. My VW mechanic, at the time, was obliging, telling me some tricks of the trade. By this time of life (I’m now 74) I thought that I knew the 30 Pict-1 inside and out, by heart, and could work on them in the dark. But…….

That “but” caught me way off-guard. It caught some other people off-guard, as well. Here’s how it happened. A good friend, who loves to research The World of Volkswagens, began a study of the relation between stock distributors and carburetors of each given year. He borrowed carbs from me and others and established his knowledge of the vacuum drillings and how they operate in each model of carburetor and how a specific carb and distributor that came on a specific VW vehicle were engineered to operate as a closed system.

DIY Vintage Volkswagen Tow Bar Pins & Clips

DIY Tow Bar Pins and ClipsI run constant ads for used tow bars. Not only so but I keep a sharp eye for tow bars at swap meets. Sometimes, I get lucky.

If I get a tow bar which is missing the Pins and Clips, or the Pins are rusted, I make my own from what I can obtain at a good hardware or one of the large “box” hardware stores.

I purchase J-Bolts/Anchor Bolts from the hardware or builder’s section for these. When Neva and I went recently to buy one for this article, we found them in the nail section of a large “box store” in the hardware department. Buy J-Bolts which are galvanized to prevent rusting. (2 of these cost me, including tax, $2.32)

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Anchor Bolts are used for slab foundation buildings. When the cement is still wet, these are inserted with the bent piece down. The threads remain showing. When the cement has dried, the sill plates and other plates will be bolted to these J-Bolts.

Buy J-Bolts which are longer than what you need. I purchased Bolts that are just shy of 8-1/4th inches in length. This way, the threads can be removed so that you can drill the Holes for the Hitch Pin Clips–which also can be purchased at these same stores. A pair of Clips cost me $1.30, including tax.

The Hitch Pin Clips which I use are 5/32nds of an inch in diameter by 2-15/16ths inches long (measure on the straight side) and are bright plated.

Each Bolt comes with a large washer and nut. These can be put with your other saved-for-that-obscure-project parts.

Richard Marcoux’s ’66 – ’67 Hazet Tool Kit

'66 - '67 VW Hazet Tool Kit
I have had contact with Richard Marcoux (Nebraska) for some years. Richard is well-known for his pristine 1967 Beetles, although he also has had other years of Beetles. Richard has collaborated in several articles with information about parts and operation especially of the ’67 Convertibles. It is a pleasure to have contacts, such as Richard, in order to pin down some of these difficult-to-find facts. In this article, Richard provides absolute information regarding the much sought Spare Tire Tool Kit. One thing which we can take home from Richard’s experience is never to give up the search! His Kit apparently never has been used and represents a bench-mark opportunity to view an unmolested Kit. Richard explains how he came to own this Kit:

With owning a couple of ‘67s, I was used to looking for all those one year only parts. Like all car guys, part of the fun with this hobby is the hunt and finding those special items we are always on the look-out for. The ‘66/’67 Hazet Tool Kit is kind of the same thing. For several years I looked for an NOS kit. I had located several ‘66/’67 kits in all kinds of conditions.

Well… after several years of looking, this one showed up on eBay and it became mine.
The following inventory and pictures detail the contents of the kit.