Jay Salser Posts

’67 Beetle Fuel Hose Clamp Tool

’67 Volkswagen Beetle — Fuel filters
When talking about working on the Fuel System of our Beetles, one of the greatest concerns we have is Fuel Spillage.

Gasoline is a wonderful “invention” but one which we should respect because of its evaporative and, thus, flammable qualities. We must use great care when working with gasoline. My number one rule is to work with gasoline outdoors so that gas vapors cannot accumulate

I frequently am asked by fellow Volkswagen enthusiasts what to do about gasoline spillage. This is a valid concern. When changing the fuel hoses, there always is the possibility for some gasoline to be spilled.

THERE IS A BETTER WAY!

While talking with my good 1967 Beetle friend, Frank Salvitti, of Long Island, New York, this past weekend, the subject of fuel spillage came up.

Says Frank—“Oh…that’s no problem! I use Line Clamp Pliers.” Now, Frank is a seasoned mechanic and knows things that a lot of us DIY-ers don’t. I asked Frank to explain his process and he told me that he would send some photos to illustrate his tool of choice.

Over the years, I have seen screws inserted into the ends of hoses, pieces of whittled wood, and other variations, in order to avoid the loss of gasoline while the person is working to change fuel hoses. But it takes time to insert something into the hose. In the meantime, the gasoline is draining. I laugh now, but I recall the many times I was beneath a VW, working on a fuel hose, and had the fuel to drain right onto my face or clothing. Not much way to avoid it if you are working with the fuel hose over head!

Frank emphasized the simplicity of the Line Clamp Tool and how to use it. The beauty is that if anything at all spills, it will be a couple of drops which remain at the end of the hose after it has been clamped. A paper towel can be placed there when the hose is disconnected and will take care of such a small amount.

The Clamp is applied appropriately—THEN—the fuel hose is disconnected.

30 PICT 1 Main Jet Configuration

NOS Solex 30 Pict-1 Carburettor

A Volkswagen friend in England recently e-messaged me about a situation with his carburetor. His is a 28 Pict-1 but the situation is identical to that of the 30 Pict-1 carburetor.

The proposed problem deals with the Main Jet of the carburetor.

When my friend experienced some carb problems, he began to search the Internet for helps. He discovered a video and watched it and followed the instructions.

When the video came to the Main Jet installation, the mechanic pointedly explained that the hole in the Main Jet Carrier Bolt should align with the hole in the bowl of the carburetor.

My friend attempted to get the holes to align but was unable to do so. Now, he thought that he had a problem. He asked me if he should not tighten the Carrier Bolt, but leave it a little loose so that the holes would align.

carburetormainjetseries-5a

By not tightening the Main Jet Carrier Bolt, gasoline will seep to the outside of the carburetor, resulting in the problem of raw gasoline in the engine compartment—a problem which none of us wants.

In the Carburetors mentioned above, the brass Main Jet Carrier Bolt also serves as the Plug for the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl. (Later carburetors have a simple steel or brass Bowl Plug. The Main Jet was separated from the Carrier Bolt and moved to a new location but has the same function).

With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt in hand, note that the area which has the holes is recessed—of a smaller diameter than the rest of the Bolt. There are three holes drilled on opposite sides of one another. This is so that gasoline can pass through the hole in the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl and enter the recessed area where the Main Jet Carrier Bolt resides. With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt installed, gasoline in the Bowl can freely circulate around the Carrier Bolt and enter the 3 drillings in order to pass to the Main Jet.

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Foreword: Rather than to address “undercoating” as a general topic of discussion, I’ve tried to keep the focus upon undercoating as it related to Volkswagens through 1979 and as it relates, now, to the vintage Volkswagen hobby.

Undercoating has around for years and years in the world of vintage Volkswagens.

The theory behind undercoatings is that a barrier could be created to prevent the infiltration of moisture. Undercoatings themselves had no rust-inhibitive qualities. They simply have been intended as a barrier.

VW dealerships sold the service to new car buyers as a preventative measure to guard against rust. It was a money-making operation and dealers loved it. Especially was it offered in the colder climate States and especially where salt was used on icy roadways.

Recently, I spoke with a former VW trained specialist. He described the undercoating procedure as he observed it. He said that the dealership where he worked had one bay with a lift, “in a dark corner”, where the “nasty” undercoating took place. He told me that it was part of a money-making effort by dealerships in the make-ready department. Undercoating was applied using a hose and gun working from a 30 gallon barrel of material.

I have had my doubts over the years about its effectiveness in sealing the undersides of a vehicle as a moisture barrier. Here’s why. I was in the painting industry for almost 30 years. If there is a coating, I likely have seen it or read about it. In my experience, despite all claims to the contrary, coatings will fail. There is no “eternal” coating. I’ve heard claims that “you’ll never have to paint again”. Why can’t this be true?

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

It can’t be true because of expansion-and-contraction problems. When the base material—wood, metal, plastic—expands or contracts, the coating is going to suffer, eventually. Some coatings are better suited than others. But the fact of the matter is that coatings fail.

Metals, especially, are given to fluctuations from heat and cold. They will expand and contract more, and more quickly, reacting to weather and usage conditions.

What’s another problem? It’s the fact that the underside of a vehicle is not a continuous sheet of metal. Not at all. The undersides of vehicles are composed of pieces that have been fitted to form a unit. This could be through a continuous weld or spot-welding or with nuts and bolts and washers. There are joints. Every place where there is a weld or a nuts-and-bolts joint, expansion rates will differ.

As well, the application of undercoatings must completely encase all of this in order to form a viable covering—it must be seamless. This doesn’t happen.

The next issue is that undercoatings historically were shot onto factory painted surfaces. In order for a coating to adhere, there must be the possibility of adhesion. Slick surfaces will not offer such adhesion possibilities. As a result, I have been able to remove portions of undercoatings on Volkswagens simply by using compressed air. Sometimes, I have been able to remove it in sheets, simply because of the lack of adhesion. I can imagine that vibration over the years helps to loosen poorly adhered coatings.

’67 Volkswagen Beetle Insurance

wreckedbeetle
Eric and I corresponded with the owner of a ’67 Beetle which had been wrecked. The owner immediately had contacted his insurance agent who sent an adjuster to view the damaged vehicle. The result was a declaration of a “total loss” with an offer of a small dollar amount for the depreciated vehicle. With reason—the owner was incensed. He knew that his car had value. He argued with the insurance company—to no avail.

Our Beetles fall into a class of vehicles known as “Classics” or “Collector Automobiles”. Their value cannot be ascertained by going to the Kelly Blue Book or to some other commonly know valuation chart.

Since this is true, insuring one’s vintage vehicle requires study before implementation.

When a person decides to insure his vintage Beetle with a “regular” insurer, he finds that the vehicle falls under the rules of the game for any other vehicle on the road. He may apply Collision, Comprehensive and Liability Insurance. But the dawn explodes when it comes time to file a claim.

The Insurer will send a claim adjuster to view the damaged car. The adjuster is used to assessing damage and applying the normal rules of a claim upon cars. As in the real-life example above, some have discovered, to their horror, that this type of insurance claim is going to adjust according to a value which the Insurer will unilaterally apply. Suddenly, you find your vintage Beetle’s pre-accident worth only a shadow of what you thought.

Your vehicle for which you paid THOUSANDS! How can this be?

Insurance Value:

The mistake was in not insuring the Beetle with a Collector or Vintage Insurer—a company which specializes in vintage vehicles. Such insurance is determined by a careful assessment of the vehicle based upon its age and value on the collector market—not as a household or business vehicle which has a calculated annual depreciation value plus condition.

Vintage Vehicle Insurers provide State-required insurance–and much more. Not only will your vehicle be protected against liabilities (claims presented by other parties of personal and/or property damages), but also its own inherent value will be protected by a “stated” or “agreed-upon” valuation. This is a process in which you, the owner, play an all-important part!

The agreed-upon valuation will depend upon your doing some homework. There are numerous helps for assessing the value of a car. But, before you look at any of these resources, know your Beetle! Do not leave this in the hands of another.

Prescott Antique Auto Club – Ron & Diane Waller

WallerPhotosRonandDianeWallerwithTrophy
Ron and Diane Waller live in Phoenix, Arizona, where they sponsor a growing group of serious Volkswagen enthusiasts. I recently had the pleasure of meeting Ron when
he came to Texas to assist their daughter who just had taken a job near us. Introduce yourselves to Ron and Diane.

1967 Volkswagen Beetle Community

I tell Volkswagen owners that in order to complete their Volkswagen Experience, they need to interact with other Air Cooled Owners. Ron and Diane have taken this advice to heart and are having the time of their lives. Please read of their latest experience.