Jay Salser Posts

VW 105-1 30 Pict-1 Carburetor – The Choke Processes, Part I

By the time Volkswagens were “in the womb”, carburetion was not a new thing. But the German Engineers tasked with creating a viable engine system for Ferdinand Porsche had to create a system that would work with the air-cooled engines which were being demanded. Bit by bit, the VW carburetors were evolving into what would become a virtually fool-proof unit.

With the advent of the 12 Volt Electrical System, Volkswagen was coming of age. Carburetion would be just one of the areas which would benefit—with better starting possibilities. Let’s look at the Choke Mechanism on the VW 105-1 30 Pict-1 Carburetor.

While there are several parts to the Choke Mechanism, it is relatively simple.

But first—what is meant by “choking the engine”? “Choking” might better be termed “restricting”—because that’s what’s happening. When the Engine is dead cold, the Fuel Mixture must be more “rich” in gasoline with less air. The Engine is “hungry”. So, by restricting (or choking) the in-coming air, this need can be met.

Eventually, in a matter of minutes, the Engine will be running well and will need more air in the Fuel Mixture as it begins to reach operational temperature. It will be “starving” for air. Now the restriction on air can be relaxed—the “choke-hold” can be relaxed and the Carburetor can seek its own Fuel Mixture levels as needed.

We will be examining only the Upper Half of a Carburetor during this discussion of the “processes” or elements which comprise the Choking Mechanism.

1967 VW Beetle Community


I tell people all of the time that the Vintage Vehicle Hobby revolves around people. It’s more than just a hobby—it’s a Community! PEOPLE drive these Vintage Volkswagens.

When I attend a Volkswagen Show, I go for talking to people about as much as I go for seeing the cars. Really! For me, it is a non-stop talk-a-thon. I’m really worn out from talking, interacting and listening to all of those VW Community PEOPLE!

It was Neva’s and my pleasure this week (1/8/18) to have a visit from Ron Waller of Phoenix, AZ. Ron has visited us once before, about a year ago. He and his wife are in Texas with family but he took time to drive over to spend time with us, as well.

We had a blast! And, we didn’t nearly exhaust the subjects, including, of course, all things Volkswagen.

One of the major topics was Ron’s and Diane’s experience on the Border-to-Border Treffen Cruise down the West Coast of the USA, which they experienced not so long ago. And, what an experience! I read and re-read Ron’s account of the trip—but to hear it in person was something else!

“I really want to do this Cruise”—that theme kept going through my mind. Ron and Diane were the only ones to drive the entire route in a Beetle, their 1967 Lotus White Bug.

I listened as Ron recounted their preparations. They worked with a local VW Specialist in the Phoenix area. They checked and re-checked the car. They made up lists of supplies. When the time came, they were ready! And, then some.

I watched Ron’s face as he traced the route in his words. Some difficult times, some really great times, some frustrating times, some times when they wanted to do a victory lap! If you have driven a Vintage Volkswagen much, you know the feelings herein described.

We had a grand time visiting but, all too soon, Ron had to get back to family.

’67 Volkswagen Beetle Collectibles


On a regular basis, 1967beetle.com plays an important role in the trouble-shooting calls which I receive. Often, there is an article or discussion on the Site which deals with the question at hand.

I also review articles from times to time—just for the fun of it. And, so it happened that as I was reviewing Don Hooper’s Article. I happened to spy, in one of the photos, the key hanging from the ignition switch.

What’s this? A unique Leather Key Holder, I spied.

I entered a Comment about the Holder and pretty soon Don replied. He and I kept up
a running e-conversation for the day about Key Holders.

I referred him to a short Article which I wrote some time back:

Vintage Volkswagen Collectibles

I know that a lot of us either purposefully collect VW Memorabilia—or perhaps it just
“comes to us” from family and friends—as have some of the Collectibles which I display in our home.

’67 Beetle Wiper Motor Testing & Servicing


Looking through my parts shelves, I ran across a couple of 1967 Beetle SWF 12 Volt Wiper Motors (VW Part# 111-955-113). Not knowing if they were viable, I put them on my work bench for future testing. 1967 SWF Wiper Motors are a one-year-only part—the last with the small 5mm Eccentric Shaft and the first of the 12 Volt Motors. Thus, they are valuable to us ’67 Beetle Owners.

Finally, I got a chance to test them. While testing one, the positive wire got hot. Hummm—not good. I put that one aside with a note attached. Maybe the old Grease was so hardened that the Armature just could not turn the Gears.

The second Motor tested good. I decided to draw a Diagram, while I was at it, to remind me which connectors were for what function.

Don Hooper’s – L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle


I grew up in Van Nuys, California. My first car was a 1958 VW Beetle that I learned to drive in, and that my father passed along to me in about 1967. This sparked my interest in VW Bugs, which evolved into a love of bathtub Porsches. I became aware, in 1968 and 1969, how US auto safety regulations made VW change such details of their cars as the bumpers, the dashboard, the knobs and seats, etc. I didn’t like those changes then, and still don’t now. I formulated that the 1967 Beetle was the pinnacle of VW Bug development, reaching perfection in all its details, and only going downhill after that.

The 58 Bug moved along and a very stock Lotus White ‘67 Sedan became my daily driver, through my early working years in Los Angeles. Several 356 Porsches passed through my hands in the 1970s and ‘80s, after kids came along. At the same time, I remained a big fan of the 1967 VW, often times driving down to Irvine, in Orange County, for the annual Bug-In Shows. I always had an eye out for clean, stock-looking ‘67 Bugs to admire. I remember one Bug-In Show where there were matching ‘67 Cabriolets for sale, one light blue, and the other beige, in as-new, never-sold condition. I think they were priced around $5500 each, which was way out of my league for a Beetle. All I could do was drool over those two examples.

In the ‘70s and ‘80s the VW Beetle was ubiquitous in Southern California. Bugs in every sort of condition were everywhere you looked. But Convertibles were not often seen. Since I was a big fan of Drop-top 356 Porsches, I naturally sought a Drop-top ‘67 VW bug. But I seldom saw one, until one day in 1979 when I spied one scruffy-looking, but in my favorite color, Lotus White, with old black and yellow plates, in a driveway of a home just a few miles from where I lived in Granada Hills, California. I knocked on the door of the house, and asked the young woman who answered if I could buy the VW in her driveway. She said “Yes!” But then she explained that the engine was worn out and needed replacing. I could see that the top was torn, and the fenders banged up. But the paint appeared to be original, as did the worn interior. A look under the car revealed a dry solid pan and a well-oiled engine. I made a deal then and there to buy the car for $675.

I soon figured out that I had bought my Cabriolet from the daughter of the original owner, as the sales invoice copy was in the Crest Motors Inc. owner’s blue vinyl booklet in the glove box. I found the warranty and maintenance service stamp pages as well as some past service receipts. Crest Motors VW was in Escondido, California, a little north of San Diego. That’s where the first owner lived, before moving to the San Fernando Valley and apparently passing the car to his daughter.