Kenneth Yeo’s ’67 Beetle

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Our good bud, Kenneth Yeo of Singapore sends the following summary of a recent Volkswagen Reunion. Upon reviewing Ken’s Featured Article, you can realize the importance of this event. Owning and maintaining a Volkswagen in Singapore is extremely expensive.

Hope this finds you well. Just keeping in touch and happy to have just returned from a local VW meet up. Celebrating Singapore’s 50th year of independence, we organized a breakfast meet, swap and drive where 38 air-cooled VWs showed up. Some extremely rare Ghias, Kombis and Type 3s made for a great atmosphere (well, rare in Singapore). This is probably the biggest turnout in over 10 years.

More importantly, we managed to get the four surviving ’67 Beetles together after about 12 years. :) Someone was always too busy. All are still largely stock, with their original registration plates, and driven daily. I attach a few pics of our event, including the four ’67s.

Keep bugging! :)
Ken

Mary & Gavin LaMaide’s L282 Lotus White ’67 Beetle

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Mary & Gavin’s story is an emotional one with a fantastic connection to the past. Seeing the early childhood photos reminds me of my own story, and how I grew up riding in my Grandpa’s ’67 Beetle that I now own today. Thanks for sharing, guys! 1967beetle.com exist because of people like you.

It was through a search on EBay Motors in early May 2015 that we happened upon our 1967 VW Beetle. The car was originally purchased at North Import Motors in Chicago, Illinois where it remained with the original owner until just a few years ago. The death of the original owner, who lived to the age of 100, saw the “mostly” original 67’ Beetle bought & sold to a few neighbors until it came to us as its fourth owner with 82,500 original miles.

We were immediately impressed to see ALL of the one year ’67 model parts intact, even the infamous dust cover on the rear deck lid latch! According to the VIN our bug was born in October of 1966 in West Germany. The only thing that we have replaced is a period correct AM/FM Sears radio with an original Sapphire V radio made for this Volkswagen sourced on Ebay.

The transient smell of the coconut fiber seat pads and the forty eight years of patina on the headliner further confirmed that the interior is absolutely original! As you can see in the photos, we added some 1967 VW “bling” courtesy of Lane Russell in the form of the Bambus tray, a Roof Rack, and Hub Cap pullers. In addition, an aftermarket vase adds a bit of flare to the quaint dash area. Along with new brakes, the exterior and rims were painted in 2009 and we have plans to return the rims to their original black and white this winter. We are in the process of acquiring some vintage luggage, cooler, and other nostalgic VW antiquities to compliment the floor pans and battery tray which are original to the vehicle with no holes or rot . It goes without saying we are blessed to have found a wonderful 67’ Beetle that was revered and cared for her last 48 years by previous owners. We are proud to carry on the legacy of our ’67 Beetle as we make her “road ready” for the car show circuit in Northern Michigan and specifically the Traverse City area where we reside.

Chris Ryder’s Euro ’67 Beetle

Chris Ryder's Euro '67 Bleh

It’s rare here at 1967beetle.com that we see a car as rare as this. Chris Ryder’s Euro ’67 Beetle is a time capsule. Apparently, it even still has German air in its original tires.

I’ve owned this ’67 since about 1985.  I bought it from the original owner in Germany. I still have the original German Kraftfarzeug brief with the original owner signature and factory info about car. This car is so original that it still have the 5 original tires that it came with new from the factory, and all 5 still hold air.  It now has about 29K kilometers total mileage since new. Absolutely everything on the car is as original and untouched.  No rust (except surface rust on heater boxes and muffler), no accidents, no paint or interior mods.

Best regards,
Chris

Sean Hart’s L620 Savanna Beige ’67 Beetle

Sean Hart’s L620 Savanna Beige ’67 Beetle

Just sent over by Sean Heart in NY, this L620 Savanna Beige ’67 Beetle is a fantastic example of a restoration done well. It also makes me really happy to know that we are slowly connecting ’67 Beetle owners all over the world.

Hello, 1967beetle.com. On July 12 ,2015, I participated in the Connecticut Volkswagen Association (CVA) 11th Annual Volks-Meet 2015 in West Brook, Connecticut which I am a member, ( I live in New York) and also a member of another Great Club the Long Island Volkswagen Club. (New York) I would like to mention what a nice turn out and what a hard working club. To make a long story short, I jumped on a Ferry out of Port Jefferson, NY on Saturday afternoon and landed in Connecticut. I then hopped on 95 North to a campsite recommended by the club. I set up camp and had a good night sleep. Then, I drove to the show site. VW time! I wiped the road dust off my 1967 VW Beetle and check out all the other cars and meet with fine New Englander’s and had great conversations and seen some beautiful cars..

Well, to much of my surprise when they were announcing the awards. I won Best in Class for VW Beetle 1953 to 1967. YAHOO!! My 1967 Savannenbeige L620 was the Big Winner !! Well, thanks to Dave out in Oregon who restored the car, and for the parts that I have purchased from Lane Russell. I must admit the car is a real head turner in this neck of the woods. I am looking forward to showing it off this summer at shows and can’t wait for Chris Vallone to have his Fall ride through the Mountains of upstate New York

Regards,
Sean Hart
Nesconset, New York

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Foreword: Rather than to address “undercoating” as a general topic of discussion, I’ve tried to keep the focus upon undercoating as it related to Volkswagens through 1979 and as it relates, now, to the vintage Volkswagen hobby.

Undercoating has around for years and years in the world of vintage Volkswagens.

The theory behind undercoatings is that a barrier could be created to prevent the infiltration of moisture. Undercoatings themselves had no rust-inhibitive qualities. They simply have been intended as a barrier.

VW dealerships sold the service to new car buyers as a preventative measure to guard against rust. It was a money-making operation and dealers loved it. Especially was it offered in the colder climate States and especially where salt was used on icy roadways.

Recently, I spoke with a former VW trained specialist. He described the undercoating procedure as he observed it. He said that the dealership where he worked had one bay with a lift, “in a dark corner”, where the “nasty” undercoating took place. He told me that it was part of a money-making effort by dealerships in the make-ready department. Undercoating was applied using a hose and gun working from a 30 gallon barrel of material.

I have had my doubts over the years about its effectiveness in sealing the undersides of a vehicle as a moisture barrier. Here’s why. I was in the painting industry for almost 30 years. If there is a coating, I likely have seen it or read about it. In my experience, despite all claims to the contrary, coatings will fail. There is no “eternal” coating. I’ve heard claims that “you’ll never have to paint again”. Why can’t this be true?

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

It can’t be true because of expansion-and-contraction problems. When the base material—wood, metal, plastic—expands or contracts, the coating is going to suffer, eventually. Some coatings are better suited than others. But the fact of the matter is that coatings fail.

Metals, especially, are given to fluctuations from heat and cold. They will expand and contract more, and more quickly, reacting to weather and usage conditions.

What’s another problem? It’s the fact that the underside of a vehicle is not a continuous sheet of metal. Not at all. The undersides of vehicles are composed of pieces that have been fitted to form a unit. This could be through a continuous weld or spot-welding or with nuts and bolts and washers. There are joints. Every place where there is a weld or a nuts-and-bolts joint, expansion rates will differ.

As well, the application of undercoatings must completely encase all of this in order to form a viable covering—it must be seamless. This doesn’t happen.

The next issue is that undercoatings historically were shot onto factory painted surfaces. In order for a coating to adhere, there must be the possibility of adhesion. Slick surfaces will not offer such adhesion possibilities. As a result, I have been able to remove portions of undercoatings on Volkswagens simply by using compressed air. Sometimes, I have been able to remove it in sheets, simply because of the lack of adhesion. I can imagine that vibration over the years helps to loosen poorly adhered coatings.