30 PICT 1 Main Jet Configuration

NOS Solex 30 Pict-1 Carburettor

A Volkswagen friend in England recently e-messaged me about a situation with his carburetor. His is a 28 Pict-1 but the situation is identical to that of the 30 Pict-1 carburetor.

The proposed problem deals with the Main Jet of the carburetor.

When my friend experienced some carb problems, he began to search the Internet for helps. He discovered a video and watched it and followed the instructions.

When the video came to the Main Jet installation, the mechanic pointedly explained that the hole in the Main Jet Carrier Bolt should align with the hole in the bowl of the carburetor.

My friend attempted to get the holes to align but was unable to do so. Now, he thought that he had a problem. He asked me if he should not tighten the Carrier Bolt, but leave it a little loose so that the holes would align.


By not tightening the Main Jet Carrier Bolt, gasoline will seep to the outside of the carburetor, resulting in the problem of raw gasoline in the engine compartment—a problem which none of us wants.

In the Carburetors mentioned above, the brass Main Jet Carrier Bolt also serves as the Plug for the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl. (Later carburetors have a simple steel or brass Bowl Plug. The Main Jet was separated from the Carrier Bolt and moved to a new location but has the same function).

With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt in hand, note that the area which has the holes is recessed—of a smaller diameter than the rest of the Bolt. There are three holes drilled on opposite sides of one another. This is so that gasoline can pass through the hole in the bottom of the Carburetor Bowl and enter the recessed area where the Main Jet Carrier Bolt resides. With the Main Jet Carrier Bolt installed, gasoline in the Bowl can freely circulate around the Carrier Bolt and enter the 3 drillings in order to pass to the Main Jet.

SOLD — L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle Sunroof


Hello, ’67 Beetle community. You might have noticed that things here have been a bit quiet. My Grandpa hasn’t been feeling well; another story for another time.

Fresh to the market here at 1967beetle.com, we have a really nice L456 Ruby Red ’67 Beetle for sale. I love seeing a stock vintage VW. We all know these gems are going up in value each year. Here’s the info we have from the seller. Please reach out to him with any questions. Let’s help this ’67 Beetle find the new home it deserves. Did I mention that this ’67 is a sunroof?!

1967 Volkswagen Beetle Classic Sunroof Sedan from Fresno California in 2010. Ruby Red with off white leatherette basket-weave interior and door panels. Headliner in excellent condition. Original 1500cc single port engine s/n # H5348568. Car runs and drives excellent with no smoke or noises. Paint is very nice, was painted around 2009 and was driven very sparingly sine then. Pictures do not do this car justice looks much nicer in person. Car has new wide white radial tires all around. Since I have owned this car I have replaced the interior seat covers and door panels with correct basket weave material, headliner was previously done when painted. Windows have been upgraded: front-ventless style, rear pop-outs. I am moving and reluctantly must sell this car.

Status: SOLD
Mileage: 34,279
Location: Grand Island, NY
Price: Bidding on eBay
Contact: Bidding on eBay

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

Digging in the archives here at 1967beetle.com, we wanted to put this article in the spotlight once again.

Foreword: Rather than to address “undercoating” as a general topic of discussion, I’ve tried to keep the focus upon undercoating as it related to Volkswagens through 1979 and as it relates, now, to the vintage Volkswagen hobby.

Undercoating has around for years and years in the world of vintage Volkswagens.

The theory behind undercoatings is that a barrier could be created to prevent the infiltration of moisture. Undercoatings themselves had no rust-inhibitive qualities. They simply have been intended as a barrier.

VW dealerships sold the service to new car buyers as a preventative measure to guard against rust. It was a money-making operation and dealers loved it. Especially was it offered in the colder climate States and especially where salt was used on icy roadways.

Recently, I spoke with a former VW trained specialist. He described the undercoating procedure as he observed it. He said that the dealership where he worked had one bay with a lift, “in a dark corner”, where the “nasty” undercoating took place. He told me that it was part of a money-making effort by dealerships in the make-ready department. Undercoating was applied using a hose and gun working from a 30 gallon barrel of material.

I have had my doubts over the years about its effectiveness in sealing the undersides of a vehicle as a moisture barrier. Here’s why. I was in the painting industry for almost 30 years. If there is a coating, I likely have seen it or read about it. In my experience, despite all claims to the contrary, coatings will fail. There is no “eternal” coating. I’ve heard claims that “you’ll never have to paint again”. Why can’t this be true?

Undercoating Vintage Volkswagens

It can’t be true because of expansion-and-contraction problems. When the base material—wood, metal, plastic—expands or contracts, the coating is going to suffer, eventually. Some coatings are better suited than others. But the fact of the matter is that coatings fail.

Metals, especially, are given to fluctuations from heat and cold. They will expand and contract more, and more quickly, reacting to weather and usage conditions.

What’s another problem? It’s the fact that the underside of a vehicle is not a continuous sheet of metal. Not at all. The undersides of vehicles are composed of pieces that have been fitted to form a unit. This could be through a continuous weld or spot-welding or with nuts and bolts and washers. There are joints. Every place where there is a weld or a nuts-and-bolts joint, expansion rates will differ.

As well, the application of undercoatings must completely encase all of this in order to form a viable covering—it must be seamless. This doesn’t happen.

The next issue is that undercoatings historically were shot onto factory painted surfaces. In order for a coating to adhere, there must be the possibility of adhesion. Slick surfaces will not offer such adhesion possibilities. As a result, I have been able to remove portions of undercoatings on Volkswagens simply by using compressed air. Sometimes, I have been able to remove it in sheets, simply because of the lack of adhesion. I can imagine that vibration over the years helps to loosen poorly adhered coatings.

’67 Volkswagen Beetle Insurance

Eric and I corresponded with the owner of a ’67 Beetle which had been wrecked. The owner immediately had contacted his insurance agent who sent an adjuster to view the damaged vehicle. The result was a declaration of a “total loss” with an offer of a small dollar amount for the depreciated vehicle. With reason—the owner was incensed. He knew that his car had value. He argued with the insurance company—to no avail.

Our Beetles fall into a class of vehicles known as “Classics” or “Collector Automobiles”. Their value cannot be ascertained by going to the Kelly Blue Book or to some other commonly know valuation chart.

Since this is true, insuring one’s vintage vehicle requires study before implementation.

When a person decides to insure his vintage Beetle with a “regular” insurer, he finds that the vehicle falls under the rules of the game for any other vehicle on the road. He may apply Collision, Comprehensive and Liability Insurance. But the dawn explodes when it comes time to file a claim.

The Insurer will send a claim adjuster to view the damaged car. The adjuster is used to assessing damage and applying the normal rules of a claim upon cars. As in the real-life example above, some have discovered, to their horror, that this type of insurance claim is going to adjust according to a value which the Insurer will unilaterally apply. Suddenly, you find your vintage Beetle’s pre-accident worth only a shadow of what you thought.

Your vehicle for which you paid THOUSANDS! How can this be?

Insurance Value:

The mistake was in not insuring the Beetle with a Collector or Vintage Insurer—a company which specializes in vintage vehicles. Such insurance is determined by a careful assessment of the vehicle based upon its age and value on the collector market—not as a household or business vehicle which has a calculated annual depreciation value plus condition.

Vintage Vehicle Insurers provide State-required insurance–and much more. Not only will your vehicle be protected against liabilities (claims presented by other parties of personal and/or property damages), but also its own inherent value will be protected by a “stated” or “agreed-upon” valuation. This is a process in which you, the owner, play an all-important part!

The agreed-upon valuation will depend upon your doing some homework. There are numerous helps for assessing the value of a car. But, before you look at any of these resources, know your Beetle! Do not leave this in the hands of another.

Joe Sherlock’s L41 Black ’67 Beetle


Sent over by a reader of 1967beetle.com, Joe’s L41 Black ’67 Beetle is a keeper for sure. Don’t you agree? (Credit: Joe Sherlock)

The Keeper: Our family’s record for length of car ownership goes to our black Volkswagen Beetle sedan, which I purchased new in March 1967 and sold in June 1995. I traded my ’63 Corvette Sting Ray for it and had to put up an extra $310 to get the new Beetle.

The 1967 Volkswagen featured a larger 1493 cc. engine with 53 horsepower. It would do 0-60 mph in a little over 16 seconds. It was the first Beetle with single-unit (non-glass covered) headlights as well as backup lights in rectangular chrome pods.

It also had a 12-volt electrical system and a dual brake system. The heater system was better than the ’63 model; the car even had a center dash defroster outlet – a feature introduced in the 1966 models. 1967 models featured push-button door locks, replacing the 1930-style swing handle found on earlier models.

Our 1967 Beetle was probably the most durable car we’ve ever had. We kept it for 28 years, the longest of any vehicle we’ve owned and registered it in four states during its time with us.
We purchased it in Pennsylvania. When we moved to New Jersey, the Beetle came with us. We brought both of our newborn kids home from the hospital in it.

I took the car on many business trips. I remember a winter drive to Agawam, MA where I gave a talk at a Society of Plastics Engineers meeting. After a few post-lecture rounds of drinks at the bar, I walked to the parking lot and found that my VW Beetle cranked so slowly that it barely started. A few minutes later, the radio announced that the local temperature was minus 22 degrees. But the little Volkswagen eventually fired up and I chugged back to my motel in the crisp snow.

We towed it across country when we moved from New Jersey to Oregon. I piloted my VW Scirocco, pulling our VW Beetle behind with a tow bar. Once we passed Chicago, I felt pretty lonely – very few ‘furrin’ cars. It seemed like every vehicle in Nebraska was a big Ford LTD. Or Chevy Caprice. Upon our arrival in Corvallis OR, the 1967 Bug was used daily for errands and such.