1967 Volkswagen Beetle Fuel Pressure

Another fantastic and well articulated article from Jay Salser. Our timing lights are pointed in your direction. Thank you for all you do here at 1967beetle.com.

I commonly hear the words—“I had a vapor lock!”

We mostly think of vapor in conjunction with heat. So a BIG question arises when the “vapor lock” occurs under cool circumstances. This renders such a diagnosis suspect.

It is very easy to blame a poorly functioning air-cooled engine on a “vapor lock”. When someone calls to ask what can be done to cure a “vapor lock”, I ask lots of questions.

I want to hear how the car-engine acted. I want to hear about the circumstances that led to the problem. I want to hear about the ambient temperature.

My mind follows the Fuel System from the Tank to the Fuel Pump. And I literally ask the caller questions during my mental perusing of the Fuel System. It’s like a movie playing through my brain as I listen and ask questions.

Did the engine just quit?

Did the engine buck, then finally stall?

Usually people try things like pouring water over the Fuel Lines or over the Fuel Pump.

Or, maybe the caller has changed the Fuel Filter.

In any case usually no firm diagnosis is reached and the next time it happens, the same scenario plays out.

One person reported that his car stalled at the roadside. A passing motorist stopped to give aid. He produced a bottle of water and poured it over the Fuel Pump. Soon, the engine started and the driver resumed his journey homeward. The assumption—the Fuel Pump had suffered a “vapor lock”—even though the weather wasn’t even hot.

Recently, Frank Salvitti talked to me about the “vapor lock” which temporarily put his car out of commission. He had driven a few miles, parked his Beetle and gone into the store to make his purchases. When he came out—the car would not start. He said that he could not see any fuel in the Fuel Filter (mounted, still, in the engine compartment). Eventually, after the engine had cooled, he surmised, the car started and he drove home.

Here’s what I asked Frank to do. I asked him to get a Fuel Pressure Gauge to connect between the Fuel Pump and the Carburetor. In a few days, he reported Fuel Pressure in excess of 5 PSI. This is far too much pressure.

The Float Valve (commonly called the Needle Valve) in the top of the Carburetor cannot withstand such High Pressure. Gasoline forces its way into the Bowl and begins to overflow down the throat of the Carburetor. When this happens, not enough air can mix with the un-atomized gasoline and the engine is choking to death on raw fuel. It either stalls or won’t restart after having been turned off.

Until all of that raw gas has dispersed and evaporated.

Think of the Bowl of the Carburetor as a toilet tank. If we hold the float down, water continues to fill the tank until it finally overflows. We have generated “excessive pressure” on the tank float—overpowering the cut-off mechanism.

Sometimes the Pressure is so great that gasoline can be seen percolating in the filter (if it is connected between the Pump and the Carb). With the Air Breather removed, raw gas sometimes can be seen over-flowing down the throat of the Carburetor. This especially can be seen if the car has been parked nose-uphill.

First, let’s review how the Fuel Pump operates through the following photographs.

FOR SALE — L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle

Fresh to the market here at 1967beetle.com. What can I say? This L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Beetle is fantastic! It’s rare that we see cars restored the right way. A special attention to detail was taken on this gem.

Info from the seller below, who did let us know that 1967beetle.com and Lane Russell were a “huge help” in him being able to get the small details right. (Huge, humble smile) We thank you! Who’s going to take this one home?

The case was machined to within recommend tolerances. O.E.M Heads..new valves, guides ect. 1600 pistons/cyl…New clutch assembly…Complete new braking system. All new interior is from TMI, except seats. back seat is original, front seats have TMI covers put on in the 80’s I just cleaned them up. Front windshield has some pits, wiper rub. Pop out side windows.

All paint is PPG…small area under battery was replaced retaining the original hold downs. Original front and rear aprons, left rear fender was replaced in the 70’s new battery. NO RUST..My car was bought new and lived its life in the San Francisco bay area!!! (I am fourth owner) Valve adjustments, tune-ups, oil changes done by a vw shop, major work by the VW dealer…I have a number of receipts, and previous California DMV registrations.

Status: FOR SALE
Mileage: 263,783
Location: Grass Valley, CA
Price: Bidding on eBay
Contact: Bidding on eBay

Dean Kirsten’s L19K Yukon Yellow ’67 Vert

In the world of vintage VWs, there are so many special people that make this hobby what it is. Dean Kirsten is one of them. A former writer of Hot VWs Magazine, he reached out to share this very special story of his L19K Yukon Yellow ’67 Vert. It’s an honor. The ’67 Beetle community thanks you!

I would like to share my 1967 convertible with your readers. I found this VW in Naples, Florida after many years of looking for just the right vehicle that wasn’t in need of a lot of repair, or wasn’t fully restored. The more original, the better. After looking at nine ’67 convertibles all over the country, I came across this one just before it went up for sale. Randy Carlson knew I was looking for a very nice ’67 and figured this VW was a good match with my needs. I purchased this ’67 from a dozen photos, and several long phone conversations with the owner. But hearing that he was very ill and his days were numbered, I made the hard decision to take a chance and bought it without seeing it in person. Two weeks later, the car arrived in Costa Mesa, CA, and got my first close up look at what I bought. It drove like a dream, and I was more than pleased with its condition. Three days later, the former owner died of cancer.

This Yukon Yellow convertible was built on June 8, 1967 according to its birth certificate from the factory. It was shipped out of Osnabrueck, Germany on the 9th, and docked into the U.S. in Duluth, Minnesota. From there, it was trucked to Pray Automotive in Greenwich, Connecticut, where it was sold to Rev. Michael Kendall of Waterbury, CT. at the end of June. He used this car for one year, and then sold it to Clifford Swanson on July, 8, 1968, also of Waterbury. Clifford and his wife Elinore owned it until July 15, 2001, where it was sold to George Limnois, who I bought it from on February 6, 2013.

The first owner was a minister who got married and was expecting their first child, so they sold the VW for a larger car. Clifford and Elinore drove this car approximately 90,000 miles. In 1978, they had the exterior repainted and replaced both front fenders with Mexican replacements. During the 33 years they owned it, they never crashed it, and always kept in the garage and only drove it sparingly. Even with two children and various dogs, the top, headliner, boot, rear seat, mats, door panels and rear carpeting are still 100% original! I replaced the two front covers due to the driver’s seat had been patched poorly. I had Lenny Copp of West Coast Classic Restorations do the special request seat covers with proper heat seams and dimensions. He also made up a new gray German carpeting section for the front only.

Prior to the third owner getting ill, George had Monkey Nut in Charlotte, NC, do a detail and re-ring job to the original engine. To date, that HO engine case has never been split, as the pistons were/are 83mm VWs, rod bearings are still original, and cylinder heads have been only cleaned up. While the top end was being freshen up, the transaxle was removed and rebuilt by Mike Gagnier of Troutman, NC. Monkey Nut also went through the brakes, pedals and rear Z-bar. This engine has all the correct parts including the plug-in style generator, short coil with Bosch logo bracket, 30PICT 105-code carburetor with air cleaner support bracket, K-code distributor, Pierburg fuel pump, VW clamps, latch dust cover and so on.

Happy Birthday – Jay Salser

Jay Salser
I’d like to take a moment to shine light on one of the greatest vintage Volkswagen enthusiast in our hobby today; Jay Sasler of Garland, Texas. His contributions to 1967beetle.com are enjoyed by readers all over the world. Also, his knowledge and years of experience with vintage Volkswagens is second to none. Also, it was recently his birthday!

Jay didn’t want me to post a mention of this, but I feel the vintage VW community needs to celebrate. Like me, he does not like to be in the spotlight. 1967beetle.com is about the best year vintage Volkswagen. Without his knowledge it would not be what it is today. As Lane Russell has grown, I’ve had less and less time to focus on articles.

Has Jay helped you with your ’67 Beetle? (I bet he has!) If so, chime in below and give thanks.

Mary Ellen Tousineau’s L639 Zenith Blue ’67 Vert

Mary recently became a new customer of Lane Russell. After looking over a few photos, I knew this was a gem we’ve seen before. As it turns out, our good pal Mark Massey over at Old VWS had restored her. A good ’67 Beetle never gets past Jay and I. This ’67 is an example of doing it right. Kudos to Mark for paying close attention to the small details that matter; the details that make the ’67 the “best year vintage VW.”

Hello, 1967beetle.com.
I thought I would take the time to tell you my story concerning the 1967 Beetle. When I was a little girl I fell in love with cars. I was only 5 years old and I could Tell you every make and model. It was much easier then. Any work on a car From changing oil to changing flat tires I was with my dad wanting to learn about.

By the time I reached adulthood, I knew exactly what I wanted. I 1966 was working by then for a retailer in data processing. I had my heart set on a SS 396 Burgundy Chevelle Convertible. I went car shopping alone. I can home with one of those yellow sheets with an out the door price. It was around $3800, Which I thought was’t bad. My dad said Flatly no it was too much. So I began to look for other options. I checked out the Mustangs…..I wasn’t a fan. I finally ended up at HILLTOP VOLKSWAGEN in Virginia Beach.

In that day I had to order to get what I wanted. I loved The Zenith Blue color so I ordered It in a convertible. It arrived probably in January. It was very cold. They took it to Pembrooke Mall. It was there a couple of weeks Before I even knew it had arrived. Finally the day came and we went to pick her up. My dad asked if I would like for him to drive her home, since it was a manual and I was rusty.I declined of course and that is when the love affair began. I had a ball with friends going all over Virginia Beach to the beach, to party and of course to work. The year of 1968 was a major change for me. My fiancee’ came back from Vietnam and we were soon married. We had an issue with the governor sticking. I would put it in neutral pull over and flip it back. At times it wouldn’t crank and we would push it off and pop the clutch. He grew weary of the antics and pushed me to trade her. We did and I have regretted it ever since. The 70 Duster was junk and my regrets grew.